Girardi dunked; Yanks donate $100G to ALS

The Ice Bucket Challenge that has helped bring awareness to the debilitating disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) reached the Yankees Wednesday as manager Joe Girardi took part and then offered challenges to the four newest members of Monument Park — Joe Torre, Goose Gossage, Tino Martinez and Paul O’Neill. Torre already participated earlier this month alongside commissioner-elect Rob Manfred.

In connection with Girardi’s participation, the Yankees pledged $100,000 to the ALS Association (www.alsa.org). The donation is made in recognition of those who bravely live with ALS, those who have died from the condition and those around the world who have taken part in the Ice Bucket Challenge in an effort to raise awareness and funding to find a cure.

Girardi, whose uncle died of the disease in April, told reporters in Detroit after Yanks publicist Jason Zillo dumped over an ice bucket on him, “I think this is a really good thing. It started here, and it’s bringing a lot of attention to ALS. It’s a horrific disease, what it does to people. And it’s not just older, it’s young people that it happens to. Hopefully all these things people are doing to raise money help find a cure.”

Video of Girardi’s participation may be found at http://www.yankees.com, on the Yankees’ official Twitter account (@yankees) and on the Yankees’ official Facebook page (facebook.com/yankees).

“The Yankees organization has been inspired by the public’s embrace of the Ice Bucket Challenge as a creative way to support ALS charities,” Yankees chief operating officer Lonn Trost said. “We make this donation in the memory of everyone who has been touched by ALS and those who have tried to make a difference in finding a cure.”

The Yankees have had a long-standing relationship with the ALS Association Greater New York Chapter (www.als-ny.org), providing financial contributions and other resources to the organization.

ALS is most closely associated with former Yankees first baseman and captain Lou Gehrig, who passed away from its effects June 2, 1941 at the age of 37. Former Yankees pitcher and fellow Hall of Famer Jim “Catfish” Hunter also died from ALS in 1999 at the age of 53.

Known as “The Iron Horse,” Gehrig played in 2,130 consecutive games before taking himself out of the Yankees’ lineup prior to the team’s May 2, 1939 game at Detroit where the Yankees are now involved in a series against the Tigers. He never played in a major-league game again.

This year marks the 75th anniversary of Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day, which was held July 4, 1939, at Yankee Stadium between games of a doubleheader against the old Washington Senators. After receiving kind words from New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, U.S. Postmaster General James A. Farley, Yankees manager Joe McCarthy and former teammate Babe Ruth, Gehrig stepped to the microphone to make his famous speech which began, “For the past two weeks, you’ve been reading about a bad break. Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the Earth.”

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