Results tagged ‘ All-Star ’

Yanks to honor Teixeira before regular-season finale

The Yankees will honor Mark Teixeira in a ceremony prior to their 3:05 p.m. game Sunday, Oct. 2, against the Orioles. Teixeira, 36, will retire as a player at the end of the 2016 season.

He joined the Yankees as a free agent Jan. 6, 2009 when he signed an eight-year contract. In that time, Teixeira has batted .248 with 530 runs, 183 doubles, five triples, 203 home runs, 615 RBI, 472 walks, a .343 on-base percentage and .820 OPS in 948 regular-season games and 3,494 at-bats. The Yankees’ record during Tex’s tenure is 542-406 (.572).

With the Yankees, he earned three Gold Gloves (2009-10, ’12) and a Silver Slugger (2009), and was named to two American League All-Star teams (2009, ’15). As part of the Yankees’ World Series-winning team in 2009, Teixeira finished second in American League Most Valuable Player Award voting. He led the AL with 122 RBI (including a league-leading 31 go-ahead RBI) and tied for the league lead with 39 home runs. He also hit an 11th-inning “walk-off” home run to win Game 2 of the AL Division Series against the Twins.

In franchise history, Teixeira is tied with Roger Maris for 15th place in home runs, trailing only Lou Gehrig (493), Don Mattingly (222) and Jason Giambi (209) among players whose primary position was first base. Along with Maris, Babe Ruth and Alex Rodriguez, Tex was one of four Yankees all-time to hit at least 30 home runs in each of his first three seasons with the club.

Originally drafted by Texas as the fifth overall pick of the 2001 First-Year Player Draft, Teixeira has played 14 seasons in the majors with the Rangers (2003-07), Braves (2007-08), Angels (2008) and Yankees (2009-present) and batted .268 with 1,096 runs, 406 doubles, 18 triples, 406 home runs, 1,291 RBI, 914 walks, a .360 on-base percentage and an .869 OPS in 1,852 games and 6,908 at-bats. He is a three-time All-Star (also 2005), five-time Gold Glove winner (also 2005-06) and three-time Silver Slugger winner (also 2004-05).

Only four switch-hitters in baseball history have more home runs than Teixeira (Mickey Mantle-536, Eddie Murray-504, Chipper Jones-468 and former teammate Carlos Beltran-419) and only four players have more home runs since his debut in 2003 (Albert Pujols-519, David Ortiz-479, Miguel Cabrera-441, Adam Dunn-417).

A Maryland native who now lives on Greenwich, Conn., Teixeira has been actively involved in charitable endeavors throughout his career, including participation on the Board of Directors of Harlem RBI, supporting a scholarship fund at his alma mater, Georgia Tech, and creating a scholarship at his high school, Mt. St. Joseph, in the name of his friend Nick Liberatore, who passed away in a car accident while the two were in school together.

A-Rod says he will call it a career after Friday

As the days and nights went by with his name missing from the lineup as the result of a lack of production (two hits in his past 28 at-bats), Alex Rodriguez took pause at his situation. Then a phone call from Yankees managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner came Wednesday that began a negotiating period that led to the event Sunday morning at Yankee Stadium.

At a rare news conference for which nothing had been leaked to a media outlet beforehand, the Yankees and Rodriguez announced that he will play his last major league game at the end of the week. Following Friday night’s game against the Rays, Rodriguez will be unconditionally released by the Yankees from his player contract in order to sign a contract to serve as a special advisor and instructor with the club through Dec. 31, 2017. A-Rod’s player contract was to run through the 2017 season, so the Yankees will pay off the remainder after Friday.

“This is a tough day,” Rodriguez said. “I love this game, and I love this team. Today, I am saying goodbye to both.”

Rodriguez, 41, was overtaken by emotion and openly wept before he could continue. He made the decision after several days of negotiations directly with Steinbrenner. Speculation had increased over the past two weeks as Rodriguez lost designated hitter at-bats to Carlos Beltran, who was later traded, and most recently to Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre call-up Gary Sanchez.

“The last four weeks have not been fun,” Rodriguez said. “It has been extremely painful and embarrassing being on the bench. I am very excited about Friday.”

Yankees manager Joe Girardi said he would have to talk to Rodriguez about how he might be used in the games prior to Friday that include a three-game series at Boston. A-Rod was not in Sunday’s starting lineup against the Indians. Brian McCann was the DH.

“You always think you have one more hit in you, but I am at peace with it,” Rodriguez said about his decision. “The goal in New York never changes, to work toward winning a championship. Hal recognized that I enjoy working with young players. I am invested in these kids.”

“After spending several days discussing this plan with Alex, I am pleased that he will remain part of our organization moving forward and transition into a role in which we know he can flourish,” Steinbrenner said in a prepared statement. “We have an exciting group of talented young players at every level of our system. Our job as am organization is to utilize every resource possible to allow them to reach their potential, and I expect Alex to contribute directly to their growth and success. Baseball runs through his blood. He’s a tireless worker and an astute student of the game. Alex has already proven to be a willing and effective mentor to many players who have come through our clubhouse, and I am confident that this next phase of his baseball life will bring out the best in Alex and the next generation of Yankees.”

General manager Brian Cashman recalled several years ago when Rodriguez came back from an injury-rehabilitation stint at Class A Tampa giving a glowing scouting report on Greg Bird, who was lost for the 2016 season because of an injury but who is in the Yankees’ sights as their future first baseman.

“I look forward to his impacting our young players,” Cashman said. “Alex has always been a leader and a mentor.”

“I’ll remember how much he loved the game and gave back to it,” Girardi said. “He has been a teacher forever. Alex has what every person should have — a passion for something. He has had that for baseball.”

Rodriguez thanked his mother and two daughters; friends and other family; managers, coaches and teammates; commissioner Rob Manfred and fans “for letting me enjoy playing this game.”

Cashman, who was very busy at the non-waiver trade deadline with deals involving Beltran, Andrew Miller and Aroldis Chapman, said there had been no interest expressed by clubs in Rodriguez, who could still change his mind after the Friday night game and pursue talks with other teams on his own. He made that seem doubtful, however.

“I have not thought past the pinstripes,” Rodriguez said. “My horizon is Friday.”


BBWAA secretary-treasurer Jack O’Connell presents 2007 AL MVP Award to Alex Rodriguez April 2, 2008 at Yankee Stadium

Rodriguez, a three-time American League Most Valuable Player (2003, ’05, ’07) and 14-time All-Star (1996-98, ’00-08, ‘10-11), ranks fourth on baseball’s all-time list with 696 home runs, including a record 25 grand slams. He is second in major-league history with 2,084 runs batted in (trailing only Hank Aaron’s 2,297), eighth with 2,021 runs scored and 19th with 3,114 hits. Rodriguez has had 14 seasons of at least 30 home runs and 100 RBI (1996, ’98-2010), the only big leaguer to accomplish the feat.

Originally acquired Feb. 16, 2004, from the Rangers in exchange for Alfonso Soriano and a player to be named (Joaquin Arias), Rodriguez shifted from shortstop to third base before settling in as the DH last year. In 12 seasons for the Yankees, A-Rod reached postseason play nine times and won the World Series in 2009. During that postseason, he batted .365 with 15 runs, five doubles, six home runs and 18 RBI in 15 games and 52 at-bats and won the Babe Ruth Award from the New York Chapter of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America as the outstanding player of the 2009 postseason.

Displaying his 2009 World Series ring, Cashman said, “We do not have this in our trophy case if not for the significant contributions of Alex Rodriguez.”

A-Rod concurred. He spoke of that World Series victory as his most memorable achievement. Referring to the final out, he said, “Mariano [Rivera] on the mound, Robinson [Cano] throwing the ball to Tex [Mark Teixeira] at first base is something I will never forget.”

In 1,506 career games with the Yankees, Rodriguez has hit .284 with 1,012 runs, 262 doubles, nine triples, 351 home runs, 1,094 RBI, 779 walks, 152 stolen bases, a .378 on-base percentage and a .901 OPS in 5,568 at-bats. On the Yankees’ all-time lists, A-Rod ranks second in grand slams (15), sixth in homers and slugging percentage (.523), seventh in OPS (min: 2,500PA), 10th in runs, 11th in RBI and stolen bases, 12th in walks, 17th in games played and 18th in on-base percentage.

Rodriguez acknowledged that not all of his career was glorious. He was suspended for the entire 2014 season for violating Major League Baseball’s policy against performance enhancing drugs, which has tainted his legacy.

“I want to be remembered as someone who was madly in love with baseball, as someone who slipped and fell a lot but still got back up,” Rodriguez said.

He got back up one last time when he hit 33 home runs in 2015, although he tailed off dramatically the final two months of the season. That stretch continued into 2016. Over the calendar year since last August, Rodriguez had batted .198 with 124 strikeouts in 398 at-bats.

As Cashman said, “The game tells you when.”

With Teixeira’s announcement last week that he will retire at season’s end, CC Sabathia and Brett Gardner will be all that remains from the 2009 postseason roster. We are truly seeing the end of an era.

Teixeira’s battered body told him it was time

Upon reflection of when his playing days were nearing an end, Yankees manager Joe Girardi recalled praying that it would be revealed to him when to retire. Then he hurt his back. The daily struggle to stay healthy was all he needed to know that the time to walk away had come.

It is never easy for a gifted athlete who has known success at a high level. Many of them need to have the uniform torn off them before they can admit it is over. Mark Teixeira was not like that. He was more like Girardi.

“My body can’t do it anymore,” Teixeira said before Friday night’s game at Yankee Stadium. “It has been a struggle to stay on the field the last three or four years.”

That is why Teixeira called a late-afternoon press conference where he announced that he will retire at the end of this season. With the Yankees in a period of transition, he did not want to be a distraction. Tex has dealt with neck and knee issues all year. In recent seasons, he has seen more of the trainer’s room that he would like.

I remember Don Mattingly telling me years ago when back issues pushed him towards retirement that it took so much more energy and work to get into the shape needed for the 162-game grind of the Major League Baseball schedule that he knew it was time to walk away, as difficult as that was to do.

“Every kid playing whiffle ball in the backyard or playing Little League, you dream of being a major league baseball player,” Teixeira said. “After 14 years it’s time for me to do something else and after this season I’m going to retire and do something else. I got to live out my dream and had more success than I could ever imagined, but it felt like it was the right time to step away from the game. I want to finish this season on a high note.”

Teixeira, who had a big game Wednesday night only to be on the sidelines again Thursday night because of a sore knee, talked it over with Girardi and told him how he was leaning.

“Are you sure,” Girardi said to Teixeira. “At this point in a season, players are banged up and think along those lines.”

Teixeira assured Girardi he was certain about his decision and then added, “I’ll do whatever you need me to do. What would that be?”

Girardi answered, “Play first base.”

So Teixeira was back in the lineup Friday night. He intends to play out the season as much as his aching knee and neck allow. Tex has been playing with a cartilage tear in his right knee since early June. His neck sprain is a chronic condition.

It was just a year ago that a trimmed-down Teixeira belted 31 home runs and was in the discussion for American League Most Valuable Player consideration entering August, but a foul ball off his knee caused more damage that originally thought that ended his season prematurely.

He has struggled offensively much of this season and entered play Friday night batting .198 with 10 home runs and 27 RBI. Tex has picked it up lately. He has reached safely in six consecutive plate appearances and eight of his past nine. He was on base in nine of 13 plate appearances in his three Subway Series games against the Mets. Over his past eight games, Teixeira has had a slash line of .333/.484/.542 with five runs, two doubles, one home run and four RBI in 24 at-bats.

His 400th career double Tuesday night at Citi Field made him the first switch-hitter in major league history with 400 career doubles and 400 career home runs. His 404 homers rank fifth on the switch hitter list behind Mickey Mantle (536), Eddie Murray (504), Chipper Jones (468) and former Yankees teammate Carlos Beltran (415).

Teixeira grew up a Murray fan in Annapolis, Md., and was encouraged to switch-hit by his father, whom he thanked in a tearful address. “I need to let you know,” he said. “The Teixeira’s are cryers.”

He thanked the Rangers, who drafted him in the first round and signed him in 2001, and Buck Showalter, his manager in Texas who showed patience after Teixeira started his career with 15 hitless at-bats but finished the season with 26 home runs. He called second stop Atlanta his second home since he attended Georgia Tech and married a Georgia girl. He thanked the Angels for “two fabulous months” in 2008 and giving him his first taste of postseason play.

But it was his time with the Yankees that he loved most. Signing an eight-year contract prior to the 2009 season, he finished second in the MVP race that year with a 39-homer, 122-RBI output for the most recent Yankees team to win the World Series.

“2009 was a whirlwind, winning the World Series in the first year of the new Stadium,” Teixeira said. “I probably didn’t appreciate it as much at the time because you think you’ll win three or four more.”

The only personal achievement Teixeira mentioned was the pride he had in having eight seasons of more than 30 homers and 100 RBI.

Yet all that seemed so far away as the injuries piled up. And with free agency lurking after season’s end, Teixeira decided this was the moment to call it a career once the schedule is finished.

“Being a free agent at season’s end, and being 36, retirement is always in the back of your mind,” he said. “If I have to grind through the season not being healthy, I’d rather be somewhere else. I did not want to be a distraction. I would miss my kids way too much to be in some training room in Detroit not knowing if I can play while they’re in Little League or a play or something.”

With the Yankees in this period of transition, there is always the possibility a contending team might be interested in a player who won five Gold Glove and three Silver Slugger Awards and was a three-time All-Star.

“There has been no conversation about a trade, but I want to retire as a Yankee,” Teixeira said. “There is something about the Yankees. When you play against them you want to beat them or play well at Yankee Stadium. It was an unbelievable blessing to get to wear the pinstripes every day.”

Tex also had a message to Yankees fans: “They are the greatest fans in the world. I was far from perfect, but I appreciated your support. I gave you everything I had. It wasn’t always enough, but I tried very hard and am proud to have such fans rooting for the Yankees.”

And soon he will be among them.

“I’ll be watching,” Teixeira said. “I’ll be a Yankees fan forever.”

Yankees obtain 3 more prospects for Beltran

On the day of the first Subway Series game in 2016, the best position player of those who spent time with both the Yankees and the Mets was on his way out of New York again. Carlos Beltran, the Yankees’ most productive hitter this season, followed the path of relief pitchers Aroldis Chapman and Andrew Miller and was traded for three prospects.

Beltran was a major trade chip for the Yankees, particularly to American League clubs that could use him at designated hitter as well as in the outfield. The Rangers have been in need of added punch at the plate since Prince Fielder was lost for the remainder of the season due to a neck injury that required surgery.

Beltran will certainly provide that for Texas. At the age of 39 and despite nagging leg issues, Beltran hit .304 in 359 at-bats for the Yankees and led the team in hits (109), home runs (22) and runs batted in (64) and was tied for the club lead in doubles (21). He was an All-Star for the ninth time in his career and the first time as an American Leaguer.

Earlier this season, he reached 20 homers for the 12th time in his career (1999, 2001-04, ’06-08, ’11-13 and ’16), tied with former teammate Mark Teixeira for the fourth-most 20-homer seasons all time among switch-hitters. Eddie Murray had 16 such seasons, and Mickey Mantle and Chipper Jones 14 apiece. Beltran also became the second switch-hitter in major league history with a 20-homer season at age 39-or-older, joining Murray (21 homers at 39 in 1995 and 22HR at 40 in ’96).

Beltran was a five-time National League All-Star during his seven-plus seasons with the Mets. Only Darryl Strawberry rivals him as a major position player on both New York teams. The best pitcher who was on both clubs was David Cone, with Dwight Gooden a close second.

Of the four players the Yankees received in return for Beltran, the most promising is pitcher Dillon Tate, a righthander who was the Rangers’ selection in the first round (and the fourth overall pick) in the 2015 First Year Player Draft. The Yankees also got two other right-handed pitchers, Erik Swanson and Nick Green.

Tate, 22, was 3-3 with a 5.12 ERA (65.0IP, 37ER) in 17 games (16 starts) and 65 innings with Class A Hickory this year. He made his professional debut in 2015, posting a 1.00 ERA over six starts and nine innings with Hickory and short-season Class A Spokane. Entering the 2015 draft, Tate was tabbed by Baseball America as the top pitcher and third-best prospect overall. Following the 2015 season, the Claremont, Calif., native was ranked by the publication as baseball’s 69th-best prospect.

During his collegiate career at the University of California-Santa Barbara, Tate was named a 2015 Louisville Slugger All-America and UCSB’s first-ever Golden Spikes Award semifinalist after going 8-5 with a 2.26 ERA and 111 strikeouts in 14 starts and 103 1/3 innings as a junior. In 2014, he earned a spot on USA Baseball’s Collegiate National Team, recording three saves while posting a 0.79 ERA in 11 appearances. The highest selection ever out of UCSB, Tate is a product of Major League Baseball’s Urban Youth Academy in Compton, Calif., where he played in tournaments across the United States and Japan as a teenager.

Swanson, 22, was 6-4 with one save and a 3.43 ERA (81.1IP, 31ER) in 19 games (15 starts) and 81 1/3 innings with Hickory in 2016 and was a South Atlantic League mid-season All-Star. The Terrace Park, Ohio, native was originally selected by the Rangers in the eighth round of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft. Over three minor league seasons, he has combined to go 8-6 with two saves and a 3.52 ERA in 44 games (15 starts) and 120 innings.

Green, 21, was 2-2 with a 4.98 ERA in seven starts totaling 34 1/3 innings with Spokane in 2016. Originally selected by Texas in the seventh round of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft out of Indian Hills Community College in Iowa, Green has posted a 6-8 record and 5.15 ERA in 31 career appearances (21 starts) and 108 1/3 innings over three minor league seasons. The Fountain, Colo., native was previously drafted by the Yankees in the 35th round of the 2013 First-Year Player Draft but did not sign.

In another transaction designed towards the future, the Yanks traded pitcher Ivan Nova to the Pirates for two players to be named. The Yankees added relief pitcher Tyler Clippard, who they acquired from the Diamondbacks Sunday, to the 25-man roster and recalled pitcher Nick Goody and outfielder Ben Gamel from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes Barre.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi did not say who would replace Nova in the rotation. The candidates are Luis Severino and Chad Green. The manager was also unclear how he would replace Beltran.

“We lost the most important hitter in our lineup,” Girardi said. “This is a chance for young players to step up. I believe we can still win with the players in that room.”

Yanks, back at .500, deal Miller to Tribe

No Runs DMC is down to D.

Dellin Betances has become the Yankees’ closer this week with the trade of Andrew Miller to the Indians Sunday following a deal earlier last week of Aroldis Chapman to the Cubs. Emblematic of the kind of weekend it was for the Yankees in St. Petersburg, Fla., Betances never got into a game.

There was no chance for a closer because the Yankees did not have a lead heading into the ninth inning. Heck, the Yankees had a lead for only one half-inning in the series as they were swept by the last-place Rays. The Yanks were flying high after the first two games of the trip in Houston when they reached a season-best four games over .500, but four straight losses pushed them back to par at 52-52.

Whether the Yankees would be buyers or sellers at the non-waiver trade deadline, which is 4 p.m. Monday, was answered Sunday with the trade of Miller. The Chapman trade was a bit different because it involved a player who can be a free agent at the end of the season and who dismissed any talk of a contract extension. Miller, on the other hand, was signed through the 2018 season and had returned to the closer role he handled so well last year before moving aside for Chapman 11 weeks ago.

Just as was the case with Chapman, the haul general manager Brian Cashman received were four prospects, including one who is among the most highly touted young players on the rise, Clint Frazier, an outfielder rated 21st in Baseball America’s midseason rankings of top prospects.

The Yankees also received three pitchers, lefthander Justus Sheffield and righthanders Ben Heller and J. P. Feyereisen. While they are not necessarily running up a white flag on 2016, the Yankees are clearly looking much farther ahead than the current season.

It was nevertheless a sad day. Miller joined the Yankees as a free agent signing Dec. 5, 2014 enthusiastically and enjoyed his time in New York. The 6-foot-7 lefthander was a popular figure in their clubhouse.

“I loved my time here,” he told reporters Sunday. “It’s a first-class organization where I signed up to play. For me now, I get a chance to go to a team that is in the thick of it and has big plans for this year.”

Unlike the Chapman trade which included the return of pitcher Adam Warren to the Yankees, the players in the Miller trade do not present immediate help to the major-league roster.

Frazier, 21, was drafted in the first round by the Indians and was the fifth overall pick in the 2013 First-Year Player Draft from Loganville, Ga., High School after being named the Gatorade National Baseball Player of the Year.

In 94 combined minor league games in 2016 at Double-A Akron (89) and Triple-A Columbus (5), Frazier batted .273 (99-for-362) with 58 runs, 25 doubles, two triples, 13 home runs, 48 RBI, 13 stolen bases, a .350 on-base percentage and an .811 OPS (on-base plus slugging percentages). He was named to the Eastern League Mid-Season All-Star Game and appeared in the 2016 Futures Game in San Diego where he had a single and a double and scored a run in three at-bats. He was promoted to Triple A July 25.

Right-handed all the way, Frazier played for Class A Lynchburg in 2015 and was named a Carolina League Postseason All-Star for hitting .285 with 88 runs, 36 doubles, three triples, 16 homers, 72 RBI, 68 walks, 15 steals, a .377 on-base percentage and an .842 OPS in 501 at-bats. He led the CL in hits, doubles and total bases (233), while ranking second in runs and third in RBI. He was also named both the Carolina League Player of the Month and Indians Minor League Player of the Month in July.

Over his four minor league seasons, Frazier is a .278 hitter with 248 runs, 90 doubles, 16 triples, 47 home runs, 198 RBI, 43 stolen bases my a .360 on-base percentage and an .812 OPS in 391 games and 1,509 at-bats.

Sheffield, 20, was 7-5 with a 3.59 ERA and 93 strikeouts in 19 starts totaling 95 1/3 innings for Class A Lynchburg and was named to this year’s Carolina League Mid-Season All-Star Team. In midseason rankings, he was tabbed by Baseball America as the 69th-best prospect in baseball and the fifth-best prospect in the Indians organization. Prior to the season, Baseball America rated him with the “Best Slider” in the organization.

Born and raised in Tullahoma, Tenn., Sheffield was originally selected by Cleveland in the first round (31st overall) of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft. Like Frazier, he was also named the Gatorade National Player of the Year. Last year with Class A Lake County, Sheffield was 9-4 with a 3.31 ERA and 138 strikeouts in 26 starts covering 127 2/3 innings. His strikeouts ranked second in the Midwest League and he was named to the ML Mid-Season All-Star team. Over three minor league seasons, Sheffield has a 19-10 record with a 3.55 ERA and 260 strikeouts in 49 starts and 243 2/3 innings.

Heller, 24, was 3-2 with 12 saves in 13 chances and a 1.73 ERA in 43 relief appearances this season combined at Triple-A Columbus (28 games) and Double-A Akron (15). He held batters to a combined .159 batting average with a 0.84 WHIP. Heller began the season ranked by Baseball America as having the “Best Fastball” in the Indians organization.

The Wisconsin native was drafted by Cleveland in the 22nd round of the 2013 First-Year Player Draft out of Olivet Nazarene University (Ill.). In 150 games (including one start) over four minor league seasons, Heller has a 9-8 record with 31 saves and a 2.77 ERA in 172 1/3 innings. He has held opponents to a .193 batting average and struck out 226.

Feyereisen, 23, was 4-3 with a 2.23 ERA, five saves and 56 strikeouts in 33 relief appearances and 40 1/3 innings for Double-A Akron this season and was named to the 2016 Eastern League Mid-Season All-Star team. Another Wisconsin native, Feyereisen was was originally drafted in the 16th round of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft out of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. At the time, he was the top Division III prospect as rated by Baseball America. Over three minor league seasons, Feyereisen has an 8-4 record with 21 saves in 23 chances and a 1.80 ERA in 105 innings. He has totaled 136 strikeouts and held opponents to a .184 batting average.

The Indians will be Miller’s sixth club in his 11 major league seasons but on none was he more effective than with the Yankees. Originally drafted by the Tigers as a starter, he went to the Marlins in the Miguel Cabrera trade and then on to the Red Sox who converted him to a reliever and the Orioles before signing a four-year, $36-million deal with the Yankees.

Miller, 31, was 6-1 with nine saves and a 1.39 ERA in 44 outings and 45 1/3 innings with the Yankees this year and was named to the American League All-Star team. Among major league relievers this season, Miller is second in strikeouts (77), strikeouts per batter faced (.448K/1BF) and fourth in K/9.0IP ratio (15.29). In 2015, he won the Mariano Rivera Award as the AL’s top reliever after going 3-2 with 36 saves (in 38 chances) and a 2.04 ERA in 60 relief appearances totaling 61 2/3 innings. He posted an AL-best 14.59 K/9.0IP ratio, the second-best mark among MLB relievers, and ranked third among relievers in strikeouts.

He will be sorely missed.

The Yankees completed one other trade Sunday in re-acquiring relief pitcher Tyler Clippard from the Diamondbacks for pitcher Vicente Campos. Clippard, 31, was 2-3 with one save and a 4.30 ERA (37.2IP, 34H, 18ER, 15BB, 46K) in 40 relief appearances and 37 2/3 innings with Arizona this year. In 2015, he pitched for the Athletics and the Mets and combined for a 5-4 record with 19 saves and a 2.92 ERA in 69 games and 71 innings.

Originally selected by the Yankees in the ninth round of the 2003 First-Year Player Draft, Clippard was 3-1 with a 6.33 ERA in six starts as a rookie with the Yankees in 2007. Following the season, he was traded to the Nationals for pitcher Jonathan Albaladejo. A two-time National League All-Star (he was the winning pitcher of the 2011 game at Chase Field in Phoenix), Clippard has a 44-32 career record with 54 saves and a 2.97 ERA in 529 games, all but eight in relief. He is the only pitcher to appear in at least 69 major league games in each of the past six seasons.

Campos, 24, combined for a 9-3 record with a 3.20 ERA (121.0IP, 103H, 43ER, 38BB, 105K, 4HR) in 20 starts and 121 innings at Class A Tampa (10 starts, Double-A Trenton (9) and Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (1) in 2016. He came to the Yankees with Michael Pineda in the Jan. 23, 2012 trade from the Mariners for catcher Jesus Montero and pitcher Hector Noesi. In 104 career minor league games (including 87 starts), Campos is 33-23 with a 3.67 ERA.

Pineda’s record fell to 5-10 Sunday as he gave up five earned runs, six hits and an uncharacteristic four walks (one intentional) with eight strikeouts in six innings. After Carlos Beltran’s two-run homer off lefthander Blake Snell (nine strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings) got the Yankees to 3-2 in the sixth, Pineda gave up two runs in the bottom of that inning on a two-out single to the 9-hole hitter, catcher Luke Maile, a .206 hitter.

Beltran, Betances, Miller tabbed as All-Stars

It was a nice surprise to see as many as three players from the Yankees chosen for the American League All-Star squad. Considering their less than stellar record (41-42 after Tuesday night’s 9-0 drubbing of the White Sox), the Yankees were not expected to have many representatives for the All-Star Game July 12 at Petco Park in San Diego.

I figured all along that Andrew Miller would be on the AL pitching staff. He has had a phenomenal year and deserves a spot on his first All-Star squad. AL manager Ned Yost of the Royals used one of his selections to take Dellin Betances as well. It marks the third straight year Betances has made the All-Star team.

Yankees fans might wonder why Aroldis Chapman was not taken along with his No Runs DMC partners, but sitting out a one-month suspension for violating Major League Baseball’s domestic abuse policy hurt his chances. There was some speculation last month that CC Sabathia might make the staff, but his past three starts (0-2, 8.31 ERA) took him out of contention.

The other Yankees All-Star was also very deserving. Carlos Beltran has been the Yanks’ most productive offensive player. His problem was that he finished 10th among outfielders in the All-Star fan voting. What made the difference for Beltran was that he did very well on the players’ ballot. Essentially, his peers got Beltran on the team for the ninth time in his career and the first time in three years. Beltran is handcuffed somewhat by a nagging hamstring, so it remains to be seen whether he will make the trip to San Diego. He was thrown out at the plate trying to score in the first inning Tuesday night but rebounded the next inning with a two-out, RBI single, his second hit of the game.

Beltran got his third hit of the game in the fourth, a leadoff double. His 3-for-5 game raised Beltran’s season average to .302, which leads the club along with his 19 home runs and 54 RBI.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi told reporters Tuesday that he hoped Didi Gregorius would have received support, but he was not in the top five of vote getters at shortstop. The Yankees had only one position player finish in the top five. Brian McCann was fourth among catchers.

The Red Sox topped the selections with four starters — designated hitter David Ortiz, shortstop Xander Bogaerts and outfielders Mookie Betts and Jackie Bradley Jr. Yost’s Royals have two starters in catcher Salvador Perez, the leading vote getter overall, and first baseman Eric Hosmer. The other starters are the Astros’ Jose Altuve at second base, the Orioles’ Manny Machado at third and the Angels’ Mike Trout in the outfield.

The Yankees looked like a whole team of All-Stars Tuesday night with a season-high 20 hits, including nine for extra bases, behind Masahiro Tanaka, who shut out the White Sox on six hits and one walk with six strikeouts in 7 2/3 innings to improve his record to 6-2 with a 3.12 ERA.

Brett Gardner led the way with four hits, including one of the Yankees’ seven doubles. Beltran and Chase Headley, who homered, had three hits apiece. Austin Romine also homered and had two hits, along with Mark Teixeira, Starlin Castro and Rob Refsnyder. Castro, who had four hits Monday in his return visit to Chicago where he played for the Cubs, is a career .397 hitter in 68 at-bats at U.S. Cellular Field.

The Yankees got six of their runs (five earned) and 12 of their hits in five innings off Chicago starter Carlos Rondon, whose career mark against them is 1-2 with a 9.64 ERA.

Beltran scratched with swollen left knee

With no designated hitter allowed in Denver, a National League city, it was no surprise that Alex Rodriguez was not in the Yankees’ starting lineup Tuesday night. But no Carlos Beltran? Now that was a surprise.

Beltran was scratched because of a swollen left knee, which raised some caution flags for the Yankees. Beltran has a long history of problems with his right knee, but this was the first time his left knee was an issue. The Yankees spent their open date Monday in Denver after flying there Sunday night. Beltran said he had dinner five blocks away from the hotel that night and did not experience any difficulty until he awoke Tuesday morning and felt stiffness due to swelling.

Aaron Hicks started in right field in place of Beltran, and second baseman Starlin Castro was moved into the third spot in the batting order. The loss of Beltran, no pun intended, hurts. He has been the Yanks’ most productive hitter with club-high totals in home runs (16) and RBI (44) that has put him in place as a possible choice for the American League All-Star team.

In addition, Denver’s Coors Field has been one of Beltran’s favorite stops dating back to his NL days with the Astros, Mets, Giants and Cardinals. He has a .526 career slugging percentage there and had his only career three-homer game at Coors Field May 12, 2011 with the Mets when he was 3-for-5 with three runs and six RBI. Beltran held out the possibility that he might be able to come off the bench as a pinch hitter and perhaps return to the lineup for Wednesday’s afternoon game.

With Mark Teixeira on the 15-day disabled list because of torn cartilage in his right knee, the Yankees signed former Mets first baseman Ike Davis, who was released from the Rangers’ Triple A affiliate and will be in a platoon with Rob Refsnyder, who started Tuesday night against lefthander Jorge De La Rosa. Davis is a second-generation Yankee. His father, relief pitcher Ron Davis, spent the first four of his 11 seasons in the major leagues with the Yankees from 1978-81.

Posada, Pettitte to be honored during homestand

The Yankees were back at Yankee Stadium Monday night for the start of a long homestand. The 10-game stretch will feature a three-game series against the Twins (Monday and Tuesday nights and Wednesday afternoon, a four-game set against the Indians Thursday and Friday nights and Saturday and Sunday afternoons and a three-game series against the Astros next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights.

As part of separate pregame ceremonies prior to the scheduled 1:05 p.m. games against the Indians on Saturday and Sunday, respectively, the Yankees will honor Jorge Posada and Andy Pettitte by unveiling Monument Park plaques recognizing their careers. Additionally, Posada’s uniform No. 20 and Pettitte’s uniform No. 46 will be retired by the organization. Former teammates, coaches and other guests will take part in the festivities. Gates will open two hours prior to first pitch at 11 a.m. on both days, and fans are encouraged to arrive early and be in their seats by 12 noon.

Posada spent each of his 17 major league seasons with the Yankees from 1995-2011. He batted .273 with 900 runs, 379 doubles, 275 home runs and 1,065 RBI in 1,829 games and 6,092 at-bats. As a player on five World Series championship teams (1996, ‘98, ‘99, 2000, ‘09), Posada finished his career among baseball’s all-time postseason leaders in games (second, 125), doubles (third, 23) and hits (fourth, 103). His 119 postseason contests as a catcher are the most all time. A five-time American League All-Star and Silver Slugger Award winner (each in 2000-03, ’07), Posada twice finished in the top 10 in AL Most Valuable Player balloting — third in 2003 and sixth in 2007.

Pettitte pitched in 15 seasons with the club (1995-2003, ’07-10 and ’12-13). He had a 219-127 record with a 3.94 ERA and 2,020 strikeouts in 447 games (438 starts) and 2,796 1/3 innings. The lefthander is the franchise leader in strikeouts, is tied with Whitey Ford for most starts and trails only Ford (236 victories, 3,171 innings) and Red Ruffing (231 victories, 3,168 innings) in winning decisions and innings pitched for the Yankees. The three-time AL All-Star (1996, 2001 and ’10) is the only pitcher drafted by the Yankees to win 200 games in the majors. As a Yankees pitcher, Pettitte was 18-10 with a 3.76 ERA (251.1IP, 105ER) in 40 career postseason starts and 251 1/3 innings and is the organization’s all-time playoff leader in victories, starts, innings pitched and strikeouts (167).

The seventh annual HOPE Week (Helping Others Persevere & Excel) will run from Monday through Friday. The initiative is a unique week-long community program that brings to light five remarkable stories intended to inspire individuals into action in their own communities. Since its inception in 2009, the Yankees have recognized more than 30 different 501(c)3 organizations as part of HOPE Week.

Each day over the five-day stretch, the Yankees will reach out to an individual, family or organization worthy of recognition and support, surprising honorees with a day celebrating their accomplishments. Outreach will often take place away from the Stadium, which will allow the Yankees to connect personally with individuals in settings that highlight their greatest successes.

Ticket specials will run on Monday, Aug. 17 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 18 (Military Personnel Game); Wednesday, Aug. 19 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game); Thursday, Aug. 20 (Military Personnel Game); Monday, Aug. 24 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 25 (Military Personnel Game), and Wednesday, Aug. 26 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit http://www.yankees.com/ticketspecials. Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Monday, August 17 – Yankees vs. Twins, 7:05 p.m.
* Frank Sinatra Music Download Card Night, presented by Universal Music, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Wednesday, August 19 – Yankees vs. Twins, 1:05 p.m.
* Yankees Coloring Book Day, presented by Party City, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Thursday, August 20 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Microfiber Cloth Night, presented by The Parking Spot, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Friday, August 21 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Water Bottle Night, presented by Budweiser, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Saturday, August 22 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Jorge Posada Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Sunday, August 23 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Andy Pettitte Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Monday, August 24 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Jacoby Ellsbury Bobblehead Night, presented by AT&T, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Tuesday, August 25 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Cap Night, presented by Cooper Tire, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Wednesday, August 26 – Yankees vs. Astros, 1:05 p.m.
* Mark Teixeira Poster Day, presented by Catch 24 Advertising, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Tickets may be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at (877) 469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at (800) 943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at http://www.yankees.com/yte, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call (212) YANKEES [926-5337] or email tickets@yankees.com.

For information on parking and public transportation options to Yankee Stadium, please visit http://www.yankees.com and click on the Yankee Stadium tab at the top of the page.

Pineda to be skipped one turn to save innings

The Yankees will take the opportunity with open dates on their schedule Monday and Thursday of next week to skip Michael Pineda one turn in the rotation. Manager Joe Girardi said before Friday night’s game against the Angels that there is nothing wrong with Pineda physically and that the move was based on avoiding overtaxing the righthander.

“It is just a matter of innings,” Girardi said.

Pineda, who has a 7-2 record with a 3.33 ERA, was the winning pitcher Monday night at Seattle and was originally scheduled to make his next start Sunday afternoon at Yankee Stadium against the Angels. CC Sabathia will make that start instead on his normal rest. With an off-day Monday, Masahiro Tanaka can start Tuesday night against the Nationals with an extra day’s rest. Pineda’s next start will be pushed back to next Friday night at Baltimore.

Girardi noted that a right shoulder injury last year reduced Pineda’s workload to 76 1/3 innings, that he did not pitch in the major leagues at all in 2013 while recovering from right shoulder surgery and has never pitched more than the 171 innings he logged in his rookie season of 2011 with the Mariners when he made the American League All-Star team. Pineda has thrown 70 1/3 innings this year and is on a pace to pitch in more than 200 innings for the season.

Brian McCann was back in the lineup. The catcher had to come out of Wednesday’s game in Seattle because of a sore right foot. X-rays and an MRI were negative. McCann was fit with orthotics and declared himself ready to go after a round of batting practice.

Rest may have done Yanks a lot of good

It is beginning to look like the All-Star break was just what the Yankees needed. They certain appear rejuvenated after the four-day break. Derek Jeter, Masahiro Tanaka and Dellin Betances were the Yankees’ representatives in Minneapolis, but only Jeter played in the game. Tanaka, on the disabled list, chose not to go, and Betances was stuck in the bullpen, yet that, too, might have been a blessing.

The rest of the Yankees got some needed R&R and have come back with a determination to make a strong run for the American League East title.

Saturday, the Yankees took up from where they left off Friday night with first-year players making significant contributions in a 7-1 victory over the Reds and All-Star pitcher Alfredo Simon.

Brian McCann and Carlos Beltran, who drove in key runs Friday night, were back in the mix Saturday. Beltran had two more hits, including his 10th home run of the season. McCann started a three-run rally in the sixth inning with an against-the-shift, infield single.

At the bottom of the order, Brian Roberts and Kelly Johnson combined for four hits, four runs and two RBI. In addition to his two singles, Roberts reached base on an error by right fielder Jay Bruce, who dropped a routine fly ball in the third inning that led to a gift run on a single by Brett Gardner.

Roberts left off the fifth with a single. Johnson followed with a single, and both runners advanced on a passed ball by Devin Mesoraco. A sacrifice fly by Gardner, who had three RBI in the game, and an RBI single by Jeter pushed the Yanks’ lead to 4-1.

“We took advantages of their miscues,” manager Joe Girardi said. “We moved runners over. We got the big hits. We had good at-bats. We were very fundamentally sound.”

Among the more recent newcomers is winning pitcher Brandon McCarthy, who is off to a terrific start with the Yankees after a not very terrific first half with the Diamondbacks. Acquired July 6 from Arizona in a trade for lefthander Vidal Nuno, McCarthy has had a quality start in each of his first two appearances for the Yankees.

The righthander provided a strong six innings Saturday in allowing one run on a home run by Chris Heisey, five other hits and no walks with nine strikeouts. Known as a sinkerballer, McCarthy had more of a power sinker Saturday as the strikeouts total attests. He also got seven of his other nine outs in the infield, six on ground balls.

This was the McCarthy the Yankees envisioned when they made the trade. Yankees fans might have scoffed when they saw that McCarthy was 3-10 with a 5.01 ERA in 109 2/3 innings for the Diamondbacks, but with the Yanks he is 1-0 with a 1.42 ERA, one walk and 12 strikeouts in 12 2/3 innings.

McCarthy credited McCann, his catcher, with guiding him through the game by using his cut fastball as well as the sinker on a day when his curve was not particularly sharp.

“My curve was nothing special, but all three fastballs were there,” McCarthy said. “I had gotten away from throwing the cutter with Arizona. Here they want me to keep the cutter in play to set up hitters in a different way. It’s hard to keep major-league hitters off balance with just one pitch.”

Coming to the Yankees marks a new beginning for McCarthy coming off from a club that was in last place in the National League West.

“A situation like that can energize and motivate players,” Girardi said.

“It’s energizing in itself just to be in a division race,” McCarthy said.

The Yankees’ play post the All-Star break promises they could be in the race to stay.