Results tagged ‘ Brock Holt ’

Bats come alive, but Yanks drop 5th straight

On a night when the Yankees showed encouraging signs of breaking out of their offensive malaise, their pitchers were responsible for another loss that completed a three-game sweep by the Red Sox at Fenway Park and extended the losing streak to a season-high five games.

The 8-7 final marked the first time in eight games that the Yankees scored more than three runs in a game and only the sixth time in 23 games this year. They were 4-for-8 with runners in scoring position and totaled five extra-base hits, including career home run No. 692 for Alex Rodriguez, who has recovered quite nicely from that tweaked oblique last week. After missing two games, A-Rod has batted .429 with four runs, two doubles, two home runs and six RBI in 14 at-bats.

Sunday night’s game was a reversal for the Yankees in that the sluggish offense was not the culprit in a defeat. For the second time in three nights, Dellin Betances gave up a two-run home run in a late inning that supplied the deciding run. Friday night it was David Ortiz’s blast in the eighth on a first-pitch curveball. Sunday night, it was a monster shot to left field that went entirely out of the park by Christian Vazquez on a first-pitch fastball in the seventh.

Betances shouldered the blame for both games, but he certainly was not alone. Starter Nathan Eovaldi, who flirted with a no-hitter in his previous outing, surrendered leads of 3-1 and 6-4 in the bottom half of the innings in which the Yankees had gone ahead. Eovaldi was back to his old ways in giving up 10 hits in five-plus innings.

The loss was charged to Ivan Nova (1-1), who replaced Eovaldi in the sixth after a leadoff walk. Travis Shaw, who clocked a game-tying, two-run home run off Eovaldi in the fifth, singled off Nova with one down in the seventh. Brock Holt followed with a grounder to third baseman Chase Headley, who had trouble removing the ball from his glove as the Yankees were able to get a force at second base but not a double play. Betances then was summoned to pitch to Vazquez and allowed a home run for his third consecutive appearance.

Vazquez’s homer put David Price in position for the winning decision that ran his record with his new club to 4-0. It was not a pretty outing for Price, who raised his career mark against the Yankees to 14-7 despite a 4.17 ERA. The lefthander yielded six earned runs and eight hits in seven innings and heard booing at Fenway Park where he has pitched to an 8.34 ERA in four starts totaling 22 2/3 innings. Since the start of 2014, the Yanks have batted .303 with 17 doubles, four triples and six home runs against Price.

Jacoby Ellsbury’s second double of the game tied the score at 1 in the third inning. Two batters later, Rodriguez launched his fifth home run this season to make it 3-1. The Red Sox moved back ahead, 4-3, in the bottom half on a two-run single by Hanley Ramirez and a two-out, RBI single by Holt.

Rodriguez doubled home two runs in the fifth and scored on a single by Mark Teixeira as the Yankees regained the lead, 6-4. Again, Eovaldi could not hold it in yielding the bomb to Shaw. The Yankees made it a one-run game in the eighth with a run on a wild pitch by Koji Uehara, but that would be as close as they came.

While the Yankees sank deeper in the basement of the American League East with an 8-15 record, the Red Sox took over first place in the division by a half-game over the Orioles, who await the Bombers at Camden Yards for a three-game series that begins Tuesday night.

Yanks stagger Saturday after Friday marathon loss

Saturday’s 8-4 loss to the Red Sox had all the trappings of a classic hangover game for the Yankees. Less than 12 hours after they were beaten, 6-5, in 19 innings, the Yankees were back at Yankee Stadium for another joust with Boston and looked very much like a team that was sleep-walking.

Granted, the Red Sox were on the field for the same six hours, xx minutes that the Yankees were Friday night into Saturday morning, but Boston had a major advantage – the uplifting feeling any victory gives a team. When you play a game for that long, you want to end out on top, which the Red Sox did despite allowing the Yankees to tie the score three times.

It was the longest home game (in terms of time) in franchise history and the second-longest overall, behind only their seven-hour, 9-7, 22-inning victory June 24, 1962 at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium. Friday PM/Saturday AM was the Yankees’ longest game (in terms of innings) since a 5-4, 19-inning victory Aug. 25, 1976 over the Twins at Yankee Stadium. It marked the sixth game of at least 19 innings in franchise history. It was the longest game in terms of time for the Red Sox, whose previous longest was six hours, 35 minutes in an 18-inning game Aug. 25, 2001 at Texas. Boston also used 21 players, everyone on the 25-man roster except outfielder Brock Holt and starting pitchers Clay Buchholz, Rick Porcello and Justin Masterson.

The first extra-innings game in the American League this season also was the first extra-innings game between the Yankees and the Red Sox since Sept. 5, 2013, a 9-8, 10-inning Boston victory at the Stadium. It was the longest extra-innings game between the clubs since a 20-inning, 4-3 Yankees victory in the second game of an Aug. 29, 1967 doubleheader at the Stadium.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi used all but four of his players in the game – starting pitchers CC Sabathia, Masahiro Tanaka, Michael Pineda and Adam Warren, the latter of whom was sent home after the ninth inning to be well rested for Saturday’s start. Indeed, Warren pitched fairly well Saturday (one earned run, five hits, two walks, one strikeout in 5 1/3 innings) but had to absorb the loss because of his teammates’ failures with their bats and gloves.

Chase Headley sent the game into extras with a two-out, solo home run in the bottom of the ninth. Mark Teixeira also hit a game-tying home run, in the 16th, by which time the clock had gone past midnight and it was Tex’s 35th birthday. It marked the latest a Yankees player homered in a game since Alfonso Soriano and Jorge Posada both went deep in the top of the 17th inning of a 10-9 victory June 1, 2003 at Detroit’s Comerica Park

Esmil Rogers, the last Yankees pitcher used, went 4 2/3 innings, just one day after working 2 1/3 innings of relief Thursday night against the Blue Jays. Girardi said if the game had done beyond the 19th, Garret Jones would have pitched for the first time since high school. Jones, a first baseman by trade, entered the game as a pinch runner for Alex Rodriguez in the 11th inning and remained in the game as the designated hitter.

Rodriguez was supposed to have Saturday off, but since he did not play the final eight innings of the previous game made his first major-league start at first base and somewhat set the tone of the game by committing an error in the second inning that led to an unearned run off Warren. A-Rod also failed to keep his foot on the bag reaching for an errant throw by Headley for what should have been the third out of the eighth inning when the Red Sox rallied to load the bases and scored three runs on a bases-clearing double by Holt, who had four hits.

The Yankees, who were expected to be stronger defensively this year than last, had three errors in the game and now have eight in the first five games, the most in the league. Catcher John Ryan Murphy had a throwing error and was also charged with a passed ball. Jones in right field with Rodriguez at first base and left fielder Brett Gardner failed to glove catchable balls that fell for run-scoring hits. Shortstop Didi Gregorius inexplicably held the ball instead of relaying home on Holt’s double that might have prevented the third run scored by catcher Ryan Hanigan.

The Yanks did no better at the plate. They had only one hit through the first seven innings off Red Sox starter Joe Kelly, who got himself in trouble only in the second when he threw a wild pitch, walked two batters and allowed a single to Rodriguez, who eventually scored on a sacrifice fly by Gregorius.

Kelly retired the last 17 batters he faced. The streak went to 19 before Gregorio Petit and Gardner singled with two down in the eighth off Alexi Ogando. Both scored on Chris Young’s first home run of the season and the first of six Yankees homers this year that accounted for more than one run.

Teixeira, Headley create winning rally with 2 swings

Here I was ready to get on Mark Teixeira for not dropping a bunt to an unoccupied left side as the Red Sox were employing a shift against the first baseman leading off the ninth inning Thursday night with the Yankees down a run. In that situation, it is vital to get a base runner, to start a rally, why not take what the defense allows?

Granted, this is a pet peeve of mine which fans may be tired of hearing. And, of course, now they won’t pay attention to me at all after what happened in what became the latest most important inning this season for the Yankees.

Teixeira swung away throughout his at-bat against Koji Uehara and eventually connected on a 2-2 pitch for a home run to right field that tied the score. Brian McCann, who had homered off Uehara Tuesday night, lined out sharply to left field. Clearly, Uehara was not at his sharpest.

Chase Headley showed that by smoking a 3-2 pitch to right for a walk-off homer producing a 5-4 comeback victory that gave the Yankees a winning series for a change and kept them for falling further behind in the American League wild card chase.

The Yankees had looked pretty limp after they had tied the score with a three-run third. They had only one hit, an infield single, after that into the ninth before Tex and Headley teed off on Uehara, who has given up 10 home runs in 61 1/3 innings this year in which he has not been as lights-out as he was a year ago.

It was Teixeira’s 21st home run of the season but his first in 57 at-bats since Aug. 17. He had that lone hit from the fourth through the eighth and really put a jolt into the crowd with the timely home run.

Headley, who has been a great addition since coming to the Yankees from the Padres in a July trade, failed to get a ball out of the infield before his ninth-inning at-bat in which he battled Uehara tooth and nail.

Credit for this victory also goes to the bullpen. Five relievers took over for Chris Capuano, who gave up two home runs to David Ortiz and one to Brock Holt, and combined to shut down the Red Sox for 4 2/3 innings in which they allowed one hit and one hit batter with four strikeouts.

Winning pitcher Shawn Kelley (3-5) got himself in trouble in the ninth by hitting a batter and bobbling a sacrifice but recovered to get a harmless fly ball and two groundouts that kept the Yankees close enough for the ninth-inning heroics.

Elsewhere, the Mariners were winning big and the Tigers and Indians were in a tight game. A Yankees loss in a game in which the Red Sox were hitless in eight at-bats with runners in scoring position would have been a devastating blow. Instead, they came up with a couple of devastating blows of their own.

Yanks come back from Ortiz blasts

Judging from crowd reaction, there is probably no opposing player Yankees fans enjoy watching make out than David Ortiz. Loud cheers accompany every strikeout or batted ball that settles in a Yankees’ fielder’s glove.

And this has happened with the Red Sox noted designated hitter more times than you might think. Although he entered Thursday night’s game with a .310 average and 42 home runs in his career against the Yankees, Ortiz was a .241 hitter with eight home runs at Yankee Stadium.

Ortiz improved those numbers in his first two at-bats against Chris Capuano with a couple of home runs in staking Boston to a 3-0 lead in the third inning. With two out in the first, Ortiz ripped a lazar of a line drive off a 0-1 fastball that just cleared the wall in right field.

Two innings later with one out and a runner on first, Ortiz jumped on a first-pitch slider that hung and got stung into the right field bleachers. Ortiz’s 46th multi-homer game raised his season total to 32. There were no wild cheers in the stands either time, just a collection of ooohs and aahhs that such demonstrative displays with the bat from an opponent can generate.

And that explains why the cheers are so loud at the Stadium when he makes an out.

When it came to loud cheering, Derek Jeter earned that in the bottom of the third with a booming drive to the warning track in center field for a two-run double off Red Sox righthander Brandon Workman that cut the margin to 3-2.

It was the 540th two-base hit of Jeter’s career, which tied him with Hall of Famers Dave Winfield and Joe Medwick for 32nd place on the all-time list. More cheers were to come when Jeter raced home to tie the score on a two-out, ground single to right-center by Carlos Beltran.

Yankees fans finally got to shout at Ortiz in the fifth. One out after he gave up a tie-breaking homer to another left-handed hitter, Brock Holt, Capuano was spared another encounter with Ortiz and was replaced by lefthander Rich Hill, who used a tantalizing, 75-mph curve to strike him out to the absolute delight of Yankees fans.