Results tagged ‘ Chase Whitley ’

Ellsbury benched for Subway Series opener

When an opponent starts a left-handed pitcher, as the Mets are doing Friday night, Yankees manage Joe Girardi occasionally gives one of his left-handed hitting outfielders a night off. Not in Friday night’s Yankees lineup at Citi Field was Jacoby Ellsbury.

This should not come as a surprise considering the slump the center fielder has been in this month. Ellsbury is batting .123 with no extra-base hits or RBI in 57 September at-bats and has stolen merely one base. He has three hits in his past 38 at-bats, a .079 stretch that included a hitless string of 25 at-bats that he ended with two hits Wednesday night at St. Petersburg, Fla.

Ellsbury, who was sidelined for seven weeks in the first half of the season due to a right knee sprain, says he is healthy but he has not been the same hitter since he came off the disabled list. He was batting .324 with 14 stolen bases at the time of the injury but in 247 at-bats since his return July 8 Ellsbury has hit .211 with four steals as his season batting average has plummeted to .253.

As it was, this was not an easy decision for Girardi because Brett Gardner, who was the leadoff hitter Friday night and shifted from left field to center, entered the game hitless in his past 15 at-bats since his three-homer, seven-RBI performance in a doubleheader last Saturday against the Blue Jays at Yankee Stadium.

The Yankees are 9-8 in inter-league play this season and are on a four-game winning streak against the National League. They won two of three games in this year’s first Subway Series back in April at the Stadium, long before the Mets played their way into postseason contention.

Yankees batters have hit 23 home runs in 17 inter-league games and have scored at least 10 runs in three of their past four games. In inter-league play this season, the Yankees lead all clubs in on-base percentage (.364) and on-base plus slugging percentage (.843) and rank second in runs (108), batting (.290) and slugging (.480).

Yankees pitchers have a 4.89 ERA in 17 inter-league games and 152 2/3 innings after producing a 2.94 ERA in 183 2/3 innings last year, the third-lowest mark in the majors. Yankees starters have a 5.61 ERA in 94 2/3 innings this season and have allowed at least 5 earned runs in six of 17 starts.

Yankees pitchers are 1-for-18 (.056) in inter-league play this year. Branden Pinder ended a team 0-for-30 with an RBI double Aug. 30 at Atlanta, the first hit by a Yankees pitcher Chase Whitley May 14, 2014 at Citi Field, the first extra-base hit since Andy Pettitte’s double June 19, 2009 at Miami and the first RBI since CC Sabathia’s RBI groundout Aug. 2, 2013 at San Diego. Pinder was the second Yankees reliever in the designated hitter era (since 1973) to get a hit. The other was Mike Stanton June 6, 2000 at Montreal. Yankees pitchers have batted a combined .091 with nine doubles, 13 RBI and 45 sacrifice hits in 385 inter-league at-bats.

The Yankees are 3-4 in NL parks this season and are on a three-game winning streak. The Yankees lead the majors in all-time inter-league victories (201) and winning percentage (.593). They have posted a winning inter-league record in 15 of 18 seasons.

Ain’t that a shame

The Yankees’ 3-1 loss to the Blue Jays Monday night falls into the “damn shame” category.

It was a damn shame that Chase Whitley, who pitched seven shutout innings, could not register a winning decision.

It was a damn shame that third baseman Chase Headley, who made a remarkable play just to stop Russell Martin’s grounder behind third base in the eighth inning, had to be charged with an error on his subsequent, hurried throw to first base that bounced in front of Garrett Jones, who failed to scoop it for what would have been the final out.

The bullpen, which has been a major strength for the Yankees, came up short this time in trying to protect a 1-0 lead that the Yankees were able to scratch off R.A. Dickey, the knuckleballer who gives them fits, especially at Rogers Centre.  Carlos Beltran, who is showing signs of breaking out of his season-long slump, led off the seventh inning against Dickey with a double to right, crossed to third on an infield out and scored on a hot-shot grounder off first baseman Edwin Encarnacion’s glove by Jones.

That single run loomed large for the Yankees, considering the way Whitley was pitching. He tacked on another zero in the seventh before turning matters over to the pen, which has been good as gold much of the season.

Whitley scattered six hits, did not walk a batter ands struck out six in lowering his ERA to 0.75. He worked out of trouble efficiently the few times he got into trouble. One time was of his own making, in the third when he got a poor grip on the ball fielding a grounder and threw wildly past first base, which put Ezequiel Carrera on third base with one out. Whitley came back to strike out Devon Travis and get Josh Donaldson on a ground ball.

Travis led off the sixth with a single, and Donaldson followed with a double. Whitley held firm again. He kept Jose Bautista in the infield with a grounder to third, struck out Encarnacion and got Kevin Pillar on an infield pop.

The Yankees managed only three hits plus three walks off Dickey, who ended up the winning pitcher for the first time this season, thanks to his teammates’ upsetting the Yankees’ bullpen plan. Manager Joe Girardi did not want to use closer Andrew Miller, who had a lengthy outing Sunday night at Boston, and intended to use Dellin Betances for a four- or five-out save, if ncessary.

It proved necessary when Chris Martin gave up one-out singles to Donaldson and Bautista in the eighth. Betances  came on and gave up a double down the left field line by Encarnacion that tied the score. Pillar made the second out on an infield fly before Russell Martin came up as a pinch hitter. Martin, the Yankees’ regular catcher in 2012 and ’13, hit a hard grounder ticketed for left field before Headley made one of his patented, back-handed stops. That he even had a chance to make a play at first base was miraculous.

It was a damn shame that Jones could not handle the throw as two runs scored on the play.

Dickey improved his career record against the Yankees to 7-3 with a 2.43 ERA. Even more impressive, the former National League Cy Young Award winner (2013 with the Mets) is 4-0 with a 0.64 ERA against the Yankees at Rogers Centre. To have to face him in Toronto is always a damn shame for the Yankees.

Tanaka to be disabled for at least a month

The Yankees passed out Masahiro Tanaka bobbleheads to customers Tuesday night at Yankee Stadium. That will be the closest to the real thing that Yankees fans will see of the Japanese righthander for at least a month.

Tanaka has a mild strain of the right forearm that will result in his being placed on the 15-day disabled list. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said that Tanaka would be shut down entirely for seven to 10 days and that the conservative course of action would keep him away from the team for a month.

The pitcher complained of soreness in his right wrist. An MRI revealed tendinitis in the wrist but also the forearm strain. On the positive side was that there was no change in the condition of his right elbow.

Tanaka had been scheduled to start Wednesday’s matinee at the Stadium in the finale of the three-game series against the Rays. Michael Pineda will start on regular rest instead.

Cashman indicated that Chase Whitley, who was called up from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes Barre to start Wednesday night and pitched well (5 IP, 6H, 1R, 1ER, 1BB, 1K, 1WP) would remain in the rotation. Infielder Gregorio Petit, who had been optioned to SWP to make roster space for Whitley, is likely to return.

Just when the Yankees were making some strides, they suffer this blow. Tanaka was 2-1 with a 3.22 ERA and 24 strikeouts in four starts totaling 22 1/3 innings.

Girardi to give rotation additional rest this week

Yankees manager Joe Girardi mentioned earliet this season that the Yankees would rest the starting pitchers by going to a six-man rotation. The first such situation will occur in the upcoming three-game series witj the Rays at Yankee Stadium starting Monday night.

Girardi said before Sunday night’s finale of the Subway Series with the Mets on ESPN that the Yankees plan to call up Chase Whitley from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes Barre to start the second game of the series Tuesday night. Masahiro Tanaka, who was originally scheduled to start Tuesday night, will start Wednesday afternoon’s game instead. The rest of the roration will get an additional day off because Thursday is an open date. Michael Pineda, the original scheduled starter for Wednesday, will now start Friday night in Boston on six days’ rest.

Whitley has made three starts for SWP and has a 2-0 record with a 2.12 ERA. The righthander, who had been a contender during spring training for the fifth starter’s role that was won by Adam Warren, allowed four runs and 13 hits with six walks and 13 strikeouts in 17 innings without allowing a home run.

Girardi made a change in Sunday’s lineup in sitting down center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury, whose right hip tightened in Saturday’s 8-2 loss to the Mets. Ellsbury made a spectacular, lunging catch to rob Eric Campbell of an extra-base hit in the fourth, one inning after he grounded into a run-scoring double play in which he hustled hard to try to avoid getting doubled up. Girardi replaced Ellsbury with Chris Young in the eighth inning. With the Yankees six runs down, Girardi did not want to tax Ellsbury any further.

Young started in center field Sunday night and was in the 2-hole as Brett Gardner took Ellsbury’s usual spot at leadoff. Once again, Didi Gregorius was out of the starting lineup against a left-handed starter, in this case the Mets’ Jonathan Niese. The shortstop has a history of problems against lefties. This year, Gregorius, batting just .212 overall,  is 2-for-12 (.167) against lefthanders and hitting .225 against righthanders. For his career, Gregorius is a .260 hitter against righties and a .183 hitter against lefties. Stephen Drew shifted to shortstop with Grtegorio Petit playing second base.

As part of an initiative between Major League Baseball and ESPN to bring atention to Little League teams around the country, a team from Police Officer Michael Buczek Little League in the Washington Heights section of Manhatttan made an appearance on the set of ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball broadcast. The youngsters were also invited down to the field at the Stadium to watch  the Yankees and the Mets take batting practice before the finale of Round 1 of the 2015 Subway Series. Following batting practice, the Little League team also had the opportunity to interview Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia. The group was provided with tickets to the game,  goodie bags and food vouchers.

Yanks lose on another historic day for Jeter

The Yankees hit their first bump in Derek Jeter’s final home stand Saturday with a disappointing, 6-3 loss to Toronto that further destroyed their already very slim hopes for a playoff berth. The Yankees failed to take advantage of another Royals loss and remained 4 ½ games behind for the second wild-card slot with eight games remaining, a steeply uphill climb.

After five solid innings, Chris Capuano came apart in the sixth and lost a 2-1 lead as the Blue Jays filled the bases with none out and struck for three runs on a two-run double by Danny Valencia and a sacrifice fly by John Mayberry Jr. Chase Whitley finished that inning with no further damage but gave up an opposite-field home run to Jose Bautista (No. 34) leading off the seventh.

The Yankees banged out 11 hits, but only two were for extra bases and they stranded 11 runners, five of them in scoring position. Brian McCann and Francisco Cervelli had RBI singles, and Jeter knocked in the third run with a double in the ninth. The Captain scored on McCann’s hit in the third, which pushed him into eighth place on the career runs list with 1,920, one more than former teammate Alex Rodriguez.

Jeter also played in his 2,671st game at shortstop. He already held the record for games at that position, but Saturday’s game meant he had played more games at any single position in major league history. Jeter is having a strong home stand with six hits in 13 at-bats (.462) with two runs, one double, one home run and two RBI.

The Yankees remain a battered bunch physically. Center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury has a mild right hamstring strain that kept him out of Saturday’s game and likely a few more, although he expressed hope that he could return before season’s end. First baseman Mark Teixeira came out of the game for a pinch hitter (Brendan Ryan) in the fifth inning because of soreness in his surgical right wrist.

One player apparently getting healthier is pitcher Masahiro Tanaka, who will start Sunday’s series finale and test his right elbow that has been treated for a partial ligament tear and has kept him on the disabled list since July 9.

Yankees blown out by Orioles in series opener

It is still too early to consider a series a must-win, yet that was how the Yankees identified the three-game set against the Orioles that began Monday night with a thud. All the 11-3 loss did was to add more pressure on the Yankees, who need to win the next two games to capture the series.

Based on what happened at Camden Yards Monday night, it is hard to remain optimistic. The Yankees blew a 3-1 lead and were outscored, 9-0, with only one hit, a Derek Jeter double in the fifth, after the second inning. It is easy to say that the bullpen let the game get away from the Yankees, but the offense was also at fault as it failed to tack on runs and force the Orioles out of their game.

Instead, Baltimore remained close enough to strike back and did so in a big way on a two-run home run by Chris Davis off Chris Capuano in the fifth and a three-run bomb by Nelson Cruz in the seventh off Adam Warren. Joseph Schoop added a three-run homer in the eighth off Chase Whitley as the final crusing blown of a 14-hit attack that included eight for extra bases.

Davis, struggling this year after his 53-homer season in 2013, was not even in the starting lineup. He entered the game at third base in place of Manny Machado, who exited in the third inning due to a sprained right knee.

The offensive outburst was a continuation of combustable forces by the Orioles, who have scored 10 or more runs in three of the past four games. What a difference compared to the Yankees, who have reached double figures in runs in only four games all season. Monday night, they got three runs without a run-scoring hit. The runs came on an infield out and a double steal aided by two Baltimore errors.

We all keep waiting for them to turn things around, and there is no better time than now against the first-place team in the American League East. The Yankees now trail the Orioles by seven games. The clubs have nine games remaining against each other, but the Yankees need to make up some ground as early as possible.

Walk-less marathon a baseball rarity

In Tuesday night’s 4-3, 12-inning Yankees loss to the Tigers, there were no walks and 22 strikeouts (12 by Detroit pitchers and 10 by the Yanks). According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it was the only the fifth time in the past 100 years that a game went at least 12 innings without either club drawing a walk.

The Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates played a 13-inning game without a walk July 25, 1917. The other 12-inning games minus a walk were between the Brewers and the Angels July 5, 1987 at Anaheim, the Cubs and the Dodgers July 27, 1980 at Los Angeles and the Reds and the Pirates Sept. 19, 1959 at Pittsburgh.

The Yankees are now up to 16 consecutive games that have been decided by two or fewer runs. They are 9-7 during the stretch. It is the longest such streak since the Orioles had a similar run in 1975 from Aug. 23-Sept. 7. The last longest such stretch was an 18-game run by Twins in 1968 from May 16-June 3.

The Yankees have used 51 players this season, which ties the 2005 and 2008 clubs for the second highest total in team history. The club record is 56 set last year. This year’s breakdown is 29 pitchers, four catchers, 11 infielders and seven outfielders. There have been 26 players this year who have played for the Yankees for the first time, seven of whom made their major-league debuts (Dean Anna, Shane Greene, Jose Ramirez, Yangervis Solarte, Masahiro Tanaka, Zelous Wheeler and Chase Whitley).

Yankees and Rangers swap zeroes

Go figure this game. Two pitchers take the mound with identical 5.10 ERAs. Each has struggled a ton lately. The Yankees’ Chase Whitley was 1-3 with an 11.25 ERA in his previous five outings. The Rangers’ Nick Martinez, who pitched college ball at Fordham, was winless in seven starts since his only victory of the season May 24.

So what happened? Both pitched shutout ball over six innings.

It was a very positive sign for Whitley, who got solid support from his defense. Five of the seven hits he allowed were at the start of innings, usually a bad omen.

In the second inning, Leonys Martin got to third with none out on an error by third baseman Zelous Wheeler and a wild pitch, but Whitley kept the ball in the infield with two groundouts bookending a strikeout to strand Martin.

In the third, Daniel Robertson led off with a single and stole second base. After Shin-Soo Choo was called out on strikes, Robertson tried to steal third and was gunned down by Francisco Cervelli. Whitley finished off the inning by striking out Elvis Andrus.

Adrian Beltre followed Jim Adduci’s leadoff single in the fourth by grounding into a double play. In the fifth, Rangers catcher Robinson Chirinos, who doubled with one out, tried to score on an infield single by Robertson but was thrown out at the plate by Brian Roberts.

Whitley’s night was done after he gave up another leadoff hit in the seventh, a single by Beltre, but Matt Thornton and Adam Warren made sure the All-Star third baseman did not advance.

The Yankees had it even worse against Martinez, who held them to three hits and one walk in 5 1/3 innings before Neftali Feliz, the former American League Rookie of the Year, followed with 1 2/3 hitless innings of relief. The Yanks did not get a runner past first base over the first seven innings.

Martinez, too, had helped from his defense. Martin in center field climbed the auxiliary scoreboard in right-center to rob Brian McCann of a potential extra-base hit in the second inning. The ball did not appear to be over the wall when Martin gloved it.

The zeroes kept piling up after the starters were gone. The Yanks did not get a runner into scoring position until one out in the ninth when Derek Jeter doubled into the left field corner. It was career double 535 for DJ, who replaced Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig as the franchise’s all-time leader in two-base hits.

Rangers manager Ron Washington decided to have lefthander Neal Cotts walk lefty-swinging Jacoby Ellsbury intentionally and go after Carlos Beltran, a switch hitter who would bat right-handed against Cotts. The curious strategy worked as Beltran grounded into a double play that sent the game into extra innings.

Yankees win marathon at end of gloomy day

It took 14 innings and 4 hours, 51 minutes, but the Yankees finally found something to smile about Wednesday after hearing the depressing news earlier in the day that Masahiro Tanaka won’t be around for the rest of this trip.

The Yankees went seven innings without scoring before Jacoby Ellsbury homered off Indians righthander Vinnie Pestano with two out in the 14th to take a 5-4 lead. They then had to sweat through the bottom half as the Tribe got a runner to second base with one out. David Robertson struck out Asdrubal Cabrera and notched his 22nd save when Zoilo Almonte ran down Michael Brantley’s drive to left field.

The game came close to ending in Cleveland’s favor in the 10th when David Huff, one of eight Yankees pitcher, walked the bases loaded with one out. Shawn Kelley came to the rescue with a big strikeout of Nick Swisher and withstood a long foul down the right field line by David Murphy before retiring him on a ground ball to shortstop.

Brandon McCarthy was the 10th different pitcher to start for the Yankees this season. There could be an 11th Sunday night in place of Tanaka, who went on the 15-day disabled list because of right elbow inflammation, unless Chase Whitley returns to the rotation. Whitley pitched two innings of one-hit, three-strikeout relief to get the winning decision Wednesday night.

McCarthy found out right away what it can be like for a Yankees starter when two regulars were out of the lineup. Left fielder Brett Gardner was nursing an abdominal strain. Designated hitter Carlos Beltran was supposed to return to the lineup after missing two games because of a swollen right knee. But during batting practice, a ball Beltran hit ricocheted off the cage and struck him in the face.

Derek Jeter, who was originally slated for a night off, had to take over at DH. Brian Roberts, who was to have batted in DJ’s usual second spot in the order, was dropped to Beltran’s 5-hole. Almonte, just called up from Triple A Scranton, was in left field, and another recent call-up, Zelous Wheeler, was at third base. I can’t remember the last time the Yankees had two guys whose names begin with ‘Z’ in the lineup at the same time.

McCarthy, a 6-foot-7 righthander who was only 3-10 for Arizona this year, got off to a quirky start as the Indians scored three runs off him in the first inning, although none was earned because of a throwing error by Mark Teixeira. Throwing to second base trying for a double play after fielding a grounder by Carlos Santana, Tex hit Brantley, the runner, which loaded the bases with one out.

An infield out, which should have been the third of the inning, brought in one run, and Swisher delivered two more with a single to right-center. Swish continued his punishment of his old club in this series. He homered in each of the prior two games.

Teixeira made up for his wayward throw by getting those three runs back for McCarthy with a pair of home runs off Indians starter Josh Tomlin. Brian McCann also drove in a run with a sacrifice fly in the Yankees’ three-run fifth as they took the lead.

McCarthy couldn’t maintain it, however. Cabrera doubled with one out in the bottom of the fifth and scored on a two-out single by Santana. Still, it was a favorable first outing for the pitcher recently obtained in a trade for lefthander Vidal Nuno. McCarthy gave them what Nuno did not always provide, distance. McCarthy lasted for 6 2/3 innings and displayed a decent sinker. Of his 20 outs, 12 were on ground balls and two others were in the infield to go with three strikeouts.

Swisher hurts old club with homer off Tanaka

The Yankees’ rotation got a pleasant jolt Monday night when Triple A Scranton call-up Shane Greene pitched six strong innings for his first major-league victory and earned another start, which he will make Saturday at Baltimore with Chase Whitley moving to a spot in the bullpen.

The rotation got a different sort of jolt Tuesday night as Masahiro Tanaka got beat up. Oh, he wasn’t completely battered, but the Japanese righthander has been so impressive in the first portion of the 2014 season that it was stunning to watch him blow a two-run lead in the middle innings and finish after 6 2/3 innings with five earned runs and 10 hits allowed, both season highs, or lows as the case may be.

Just as they had for Greene the night before, the Yankees broke out to an early lead against the Indians, who helped matters along with some shabby defense. The Tribe made three errors in the first five innings, including a wild throw to second base by catcher Yon Gomes on a double steal that allowed Jacoby Ellsbury to score the second run of the first inning. Mark Teixeira, who drove in the first run with a single, got his first stolen base of the season on the back end of the twin swipe.

The teams exchanged runs over the next inning before Tanaka seemed to settle in. His splitter got him five strikeouts into the fourth inning, but he seemed to abandon it in favor of his slider. A hanger to Nick Swisher proved especially costly as the former Yankees outfielder crushed it for a two-run home run, his second homer in two nights, that put the Indians ahead in the sixth.

Tanaka had even more problems with Michael Brantley, who doubled in a run in the first inning, doubled in another with two out in the fifth and bashed his 14th homer in the seventh. The two will be American League teammates in next week’s All-Star Game. I wonder if Tanaka will shake Brantley’s hand.

It marked the second straight game that Tanaka gave up four or more runs, although he won that previous start. What made this game interesting is that usually Tanaka dominates the first time he faces a club. This was Cleveland’s first look at Tanaka, and the Tribe obviously took the correct approach.

It did not help Tanaka one bit that the Yankees could not pad on their 2-0 and 3-1 leads. They did not get a hit after the third inning as Indians starter Trevor Bauer pitched four scoreless innings and relievers Bryan Shaw and Corey Allen added one apiece. The last 13 Yankees batters in the game were retired, five on strikeouts.

Ellsbury made a rare base-running blunder in the fifth when he was thrown out trying to steal third base with a left-handed batter, Brian McCann, at the plate with two out. Making the third out on such an attempt is a cardinal sin but was overlooked at the time because the Yankees had a two-run lead. But not for long.

Newcomer Brandon McCarthy will make his first start for the Yankees Wednesday night at Progressive Field. Ready for another jolt?