Results tagged ‘ Eric Young Jr. ’

Gamel traded, Young obtained in minor league deals

One day after being named the International League Player of the Year, outfielder Ben Gamel was traded by the Yankees to Seattle for right-handed pitchers Juan De Paula and Jio Orozco. They also acquired outfielder Eric Young Jr. from Milwaukee for cash considerations and assigned him to Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

De Paula, 18, was 1-2 with a 3.07 ERA and 53 strikeouts in 41 innings over 11 games, including seven starts, for the Rookie-level Arizona League Mariners this year. Originally signed as a non-drafted free agent July 2, 2014, the 6-foot-3, 165-pounder is in his second minor league season after pitching in the Dominican Summer League in 2015. Overall, the Santo Domingo native has a 6-6 minor league record with a 2.58 ERA and 121 strikeouts in 118 2/3 innings in 25 games (21 starts).

Orozco, 19, was 2-2 with a 4.07 ERA and 63 strikeouts in 48 2/3 innings in 12 games, including five starts, for the Arizona League Mariners. Originally drafted in the 14th round of the 2015 First-Year Player Draft, the 6-foot-1-inch, 210-pound native of Tucson, Ariz., has played both his minor league seasons with the AZL Mariners and has an overall record of 5-3 with a 3.73 ERA and 87 strikeouts in 70 innings in 20 games (eight starts).

Gamel, 24, made his major-league debut with the Yankees this year and had 1-for-8 (.125) with a walk in six games. His IL MVP season at SWB featured his hitting .308 was named the International League MVP this season after hitting .308 (149-for-483) with 80 runs, 26 doubles, five triples, six home runs, 51 RBI and 19 stolen bases in 116 games and 483 at-bats. In 660 games over seven minor league seasons, Gamel is a .288 hitter with 349 runs, 160 doubles, 32 triples, 26 homers, 311 RBI and 94 stolen bases in 2,617 at-bats. He was originally selected by the Yankees in the 10th round of the 2010 First-Year Player Draft.

Young, 31, played in 116 games this year with Triple-A Colorado Springs and batted .263 with 48 runs, nine doubles, two triples, three home runs, 30 RBI, 30 walks, 23 steals and a .338 on-base percentage in 289 at-bats. Originally selected in the 30th round of the 2003 First-Year Player Draft, the switch-hitting outfielder has played in seven major-league seasons and hit .247 with 237 runs, 58 doubles, 20 triples, eight home runs, 88 RBI and 144 stolen bases in 557 games and 1,505 at-bats combined with the Rockies (2009-13), Mets (2013-15) and Braves (2015). In 2013, Young led the National League in stolen bases with 46.

Tanaka brilliant in 4-hit shutout of Mets

Quality pitching finally arrived in this year’s Subway Series, courtesy of Masahiro Tanaka. The Japanese righthander gave the Yankees precisely what they needed Wednesday night at Citi Field after being outscored by the Mets, 21-14, in the first two games at Yankee Stadium.

Tanaka earned his first complete game and shutout in the United States with a dazzling four-hitter, 4-0. He did not walk a batter and struck out eight. In addition, he rubbed the Mets face in it a bit by getting his first major-league hit, a single to center field off reliever Jose Valverde with two out in the eighth inning. Mets pitchers do not have a hit this season. Their 0-for-64 is the longest hitless streak of any pitching staff from the start of a season in history.

Tanaka silenced the Mets’ bats as well as most throats in the crowd of 35,577. In doing so, he improved his record to 6-0, which is a quarter of the way towards the 24-0 mark he compiled last year in Japan. Yankees fans surely see by now why the club was so high on signing Tanaka in the off-season. Six weeks into the season, he has emerged as the staff ace in a rotation that has been beset with injuries.

The Yankees spoiled the major-league debut of righthander Rafael Montero, a top pitching prospect for the Mets who has nothing to be ashamed about in his first outing. He gave up home runs to the Yanks’ two hottest hitters, Yangervis Solarte and Mark Teixeira, and another tainted run on one of Brian Roberts’ two triples that was misplayed by left fielder Eric Young Jr.

Tanaka got the Yankees through a game in which they were quite a bit short-handed. Not only did he bring relief to a worn-out relief corps but also allowed Carlos Beltran (right elbow bone spur) and Ichiro Suzuki (back and right knee soreness) additional time to heal their wounds.

Tanaka has won more games without a loss from the start of the season than any Yankees rookie pitcher since Hall of Famer Whitey Ford started his career 9-0 in 1950. Tanaka is also the first Yankees pitcher rookie or otherwise to pitch at least 6 1/3 innings in eight consecutive starts from the beginning of a season since Mel Queen did so in his first nine starts of 1944.

So desperate were the Mets for runs they tried to exploit the Yankees’ use of the over-shift by going for cheap stolen bases. It worked in the first inning for Daniel Murphy, who swiped an unprotected second base in front of Roberts, who was stationed in shallow right-center field with David Wright at the plate. It was to no avail as Wright and Curtis Granderson both flied out.

Chris Young tried the same thing in the fifth after he led off with a single. This time, Solarte from his over-shifted third base position was quick to cover second base as Young was thrown out by catcher Brian McCann.

Tanaka allowed only two Mets players to get as far as second base. In addition to Murphy in the first, Eric Young Jr. got there with a two-out double in the sixth before Murphy grounded out. Playing right field with Beltran and Suzuki unavailable, Alfonso Soriano made the fielding play of the game with a leaping catch to haul down a warning-track drive by Murphy in the fourth inning.

The definition of a stopper is a starting pitcher to stops losing streaks. Tanaka did just that in ending a four-game slide and also a six-gamer at the hands of the Mets over the past two seasons. Quality pitching will do that every time.

Think before you dive

An error in judgment by Mets left fielder Eric Young Jr. if not an actual error in the box score helped the Yankees to a run in the first inning Wednesday night at Citi Field. With Yangervis Solarte on first base and two out, Brian Roberts stroked a liner to left field.

Young came in charging and attempted a diving catch only to have the ball hit in front of his glove and bounce over it going all the way to the wall for a triple and a run batted in for Roberts. Young would have been smarter by fielding the ball on one hop that would have been a single for Roberts instead and likely would have advanced Solarte only to second base.

Perhaps Young forgot that the next batter was Masahiro Tanaka, a pitcher who normally does not bat in the American League and who had only three plate appearances this year, all in his previous start. Tanaka struck out in each of those at-bats last Friday night. He made contact this time but flied out to right. Still, he came away from the inning with a run to work with.

Injuries beginning to mount for Yankees

When losing a game to the Mets is not the worst thing that happened to the Yankees you know they are in trouble. The Mets extended their winning streak over the Yankees to five games with a 9-7 victory Monday night in one of those see-saw games that often favors the club that has last licks.

It did not work that way for the Yankees, although they did put the potential tying runs on base against Kyle Farnsworth before Brian McCann hit a smoking grounder to first base that resulted in a game-ending, 3-5-3 double play. That’s right 5. Third baseman David Wright was covering second base with an over-shift alignment on McCann.

The Yankees blew leads of 4-1 and 7-4 to the Mets, who stroked four home runs, including a two-run shot by Curtis Granderson in his return to Yankee Stadium. Travis d’Arnaud, Eric Young Jr. and Chris Young also went deep for the Mets to trump an early grand slam by Yankees left fielder Brett Gardner. Chris Young followed a broken-bat RBI single by Lucas Duda with a two-run blast to left in the eighth inning that turned the game in the Mets’ direction.

Now the really bad stuff:

Carlos Beltran had to be pinch-hit for in the seventh inning of a one-run game because he hyper-extended his right elbow between innings in the batting cage where most designated hitters spend their time preparing for future at-bats.

Ichiro Suzuki did not take batting practice perhaps for the first time in his career and was unavailable for pinch hitting or running duties due to a jammed right knee and a sore back the result of his attempt fora diving catch Sunday at Milwaukee.

Relief pitcher Shawn Kelley also has back issues and was unavailable out of the bullpen on a night when the relief corps needed major aid.

Mark Teixeira did not start at first base because of weary legs and a tender groin. He was able to pinch hit in the ninth but when he drove a liner into the corner had to settle for a single. Manager Joe Girardi said Tex likely would have made second base had his legs been normal, and that would have taken the double play out of the equation that inning.

CC Sabathia, who was placed on the 15-day disabled list because of fluid buildup in his right knee, was headed south to visit Dr. James Andrews, the noted orthopedist, for a second opinion on his condition.

Had enough? Girardi has and is trying hard not to think 2014 will be a continuation of 2013 when a franchise-record 56 players were needed to navigate through a injury-riddled season. Already this year the Yankees have used 36 players, including 19 pitchers (20 if you count infielder Dean Anna, who tossed an inning).

Kelly Johnson and Yangervis Solarte, who began the season in a platoon at third base, triggered a three-run rally in the sixth inning that unlocked a 4-4 score. Yankees starter Hiroki Kuroda coughed up a 4-1 lead on a solo home run in the fifth by d’Arnaud and a two-run shot in the sixth by Granderson, who just needed a shot of the Stadium to get back on track.

It was Granderson’s 65th career home run in 910 at-bats at the Stadium, an average of one every 14 at-bats. Grandy hit 63 homers at the Stadium in his four seasons with the Yankees, which accounted for 54.8 percent of his dinger output during his time here. I would have thought that percentage would be higher, but Curtis showed he could hit the long ball elsewhere than the Bronx, which should be encouraging to him.

After a messy second inning in which he gave up the salami to Gardner, Bartolo Colon settled down and pitched three scoreless innings as his team clawed back into the game. It all came apart for Colon in the sixth.

Solarte followed a one-out double by Alfonso Soriano with a single to break the tie. Johnson, playing first base for Teixeira, was credited with a triple on a drive to left-center hat was poorly played by Eric Young Jr. to score Solarte.

Johnson displayed questionable judgment in trying to score on Brian Roberts’ grounder to the left side against a drawn-in infield and was thrown out in a rundown. Gardner sent Colon packing with a dart of a single to right field that put Roberts on third. On a steal attempt by Gardner, d’Arnaud threw the ball into center field which allowed Roberts to score.

Kuroda came out of the game at the start of the seventh. Alfredo Aceves, a candidate to start Thursday night, came in on his throw day but was not sharp. He walked d’Arnaud to start the inning and one out later gave up Eric Young Jr.’s first home run of the season that got the Mets back to a run.

Daniel Murphy singled after Young’s homer. Aceves got a big out by catching Wright looking at a slider for a called third strike. With Granderson at bat and a 2-2 count, Murphy tried to steal second and was thrown out by McCann. Granderson is strikeout prone, but it did not make much sense to me to run Murphy there. It was a nice break for the Yankees on a night when not much else went their way.