Results tagged ‘ HOPE Week ’

Yankees keep faith during HOPE Week

Not to take anything away from the Yankees’ four-game sweep of the Angels, but it came against a team floundering near the bottom of the American League West and with 10 players on the 15-day disabled list. The Tigers came to town Friday night and offered a more formidable challenge. Then the Yankees went out and treated them like the Angels.

CC Sabathia was masterful again with seven shutout innings and finally got a winning decision to show for his stellar work in the 4-0 victory that moved the Yankees’ record one game over .500 at 31-30 for the first time since April 13 when they were 4-3.

Over his previous three starts Sabathia had allowed only two earned runs in 18 innings (1.00 ERA), yet was 0-2 with a no-decision. Friday night, he limited Detroit to four hits, all singles, and two walks with four strikeouts. He was backed by a double play in the fifth inning after his throwing error put runners on first and third with one out. That was the only time CC had to sweat.

Sabathia has pitched 12 consecutive scoreless innings and has allowed two runs over his past 25 innings (0.72 ERA), which has shrunk his ERA for the season to 2.28 to go with a 4-4 record. The Tigers were hitless in six at-bats with runners in scoring position against Sabathia.

Yankees outfielders could have stayed in the dugout. There was not a single putout by the Yankees in the outfield.

The Yankees struck early against Tigers starter Mike Pelfrey (1-6), who settled down after the three-run first inning but it was too late. Brett Gardner continued his hot stretch with a one-out single. Carlos Beltran, equally as hot, went against the shift with a single to left.

A walk to Alex Rodriguez loaded the bases and another to Brian McCann forced home a run. Pelfrey got a brief reprieve with a strikeout of Starlin Castro before Didi Gregorius doubled to left for two runs. An errant pickoff at first base by Detroit catcher James McCann (no relation to Brian, although each wears uniform No. 34) led to an unearned run in the third on a single by Beltran.

It has been quite a homestand for Beltran, who has 9-for-19 (.474) with two doubles, three home runs and 11 RBI. He also has 15 hits in his past 38 at-bats, a .395 stretch. Gardner is right with him. He has 9-for-18 (.500) with nine runs, a double and two RBI on the homestand and in his eight-game hitting streak is batting .533 in 30 at-bats to hike his season batting average 50 points to .262.

The Yankees were 5-0 during HOPE Week, which improved their overall record during such weeks since the community-service initiative was begun in 2009 to 28-10 (.737).

“We’re thinking about having HOPE Week again next week,” manager Joe Girardi said.

A heavenly sweep gets Yanks back to .500

As far as the Yankees are concerned, the Angels were heaven sent.

The visitors from Orange County, Calif., have 10 players on the disabled list, although with reigning American League Most Valuable Player Mike Trout and former three-time National League MVP Albert Pujols the Halos can still do some damage.

Just not against the Yankees this week. The Yanks returned from a 4-8 trip through four cities to the comfort of Yankee Stadium and a struggling foe from the AL West and completed a four-game sweep that got them back to .500 at 30-30.

It was the Yankees’ first four-game sweep of the Angels since July 21-24, 1994 at Anaheim and their first at the Stadium since July 22-25, 1993. They have won 10 consecutive games outside their division. This is also HOPE Week, the Yankees’ community-service initiative that has been something of a good-luck charm for the team. Since HOPE Week’s founding in 2009, the first year of the current Stadium, the Yankees are 27-10 (.730) during those weeks. They have won 15 of the past 17 HOPE Week games.

Thursday night’s 6-3 victory was fashioned primarily from a five-run fifth inning against Angels starter Jhoulys Chacin, who was obtained last month from the Braves. The Yankees entered the inning trailing 1-0, but a one-out, RBI single by Chris Parmelee tied the score.

After Jacoby Ellsbury singled and Brett Gardner walked to load the bases, Carlos Beltran doubled for two runs, Alex Rodriguez contributed a scoring fly ball and Brian McCann doubled in a run.

Ivan Nova, who scared the Yankees last Saturday when he nearly gave back all of a 7-0 lead, yielded a two-run, pinch-hit home run to Jefry Marte in the seventh, but the bullpen trio that has earned a new nickname kept the game from getting out of control. Nova has pitched at least six innings in five straight starts.

Thursday night marked the first game the Yankees marketed t-shirts for “No Runs DMC,” a takeoff on the rap group Run DMC. The letters obviously stand for D (Dellin Betances), M (Andrew Miller) and C (Aroldis Chapman). They combined for 2 2/3 innings of shutout, two-hit, four-strikeout relief. The Yankees are 8-0 with a 1.85 ERA in the game when all three relievers have pitched.

Rodriguez got his second RBI of the game in the seventh with a double that scored Gardner, who singled and made it around to third base on a balk and a wild pitch by reliever Cory Rasmus. Gardner had quite a series with eight hits in 15 at-bats (.533), seven runs, one double and two RBI. The left fielder is batting .556 in 27 at-bats in his seven-game hitting streak that has raised his season batting average from .211 to .261.

The Yankees have scored at least five runs in seven off their past eight games and are averaging six runs per game in that stretch while batting .323 in 282 at-bats.

One downer from Thursday night was the likely loss to injury of yet another first baseman. Parmelee had to be helped off the field after making a split to catch a throw from Didi Gregorius for the third out of the Angels seventh. Parmelee, who hit two home runs Wednesday night, was to undergo an MRI exam on his right hamstring and groin. Parmelee was only the second player to homer twice in his Yankees debut. The other was Roger Maris on Opening Day in 1960 at Boston. Greg Bird and Dustin Ackley have both had surgery this year and are out for the season, and Mark Teixeira is on the 15-day disabled list because of a cartilage tear in his right knee.

Who’s on first, indeed.

HOPE Week: ‘Barbershop Books’

Ronald Torreyes, CC Sabathia, Mark Teixeira, Alvin Irby and Dellin Betances read to children at Denny Moe’s Superstar Barbershop in Harlem.


Waiting for a haircut can be boring for a child, unless he or she happens to be at Denny Moe’s Superstar Barbershop on Frederick Douglass Boulevard in Harlem. There in a corner of the 10-chair facility is a bookcase filled with reading material designed for children.
As part of the HOPE Week initiative Thursday, the Yankees paid a visit to Denny Moe’s where Alvin Irby, the founder of Barbershop Books, was reading “Precious and the Boo Hog” to a dozen first graders from nearby Harlem Children’s Zone Promise Academy.

Pretty soon, pitchers CC Sabathia and Dellin Betances, first baseman Mark Teixeira and infielder Ronald Torreyes got into the act and were joined by Bronx rapper Fat Joe. They took turns reading the pages of the popular children’s book, “No David,” to the youngsters while customers were getting their hair shorn.

“This is what it’s all about,” Betances said. “Education is a top priority. What better way to wait your turn than reading a book. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

Neither had Irby, a former kindergarten and first grade teacher, until two years ago when he got the idea to create reading areas in barbershops to help children develop a healthy reading habit in hopes of it becoming an ingrained part of their lifestyle as they grow up. Barbershop Books is a community-based literacy program that creates child-friendly reading spaces for children ages 4-8 in barbershops.

“Everybody has a favorite barbershop, but this is a place where kids can get more than a haircut,” Sabathia said. “It was great to see their faces light up while we were reading. I have little ones at home, so I’m now reading a lot of Harry Potter books.”

“I read books to my kids,” Teixeira said. “It is one of life’s simple pleasures. It’s important to bring attention to this program so it can expand. Maybe our donation will help.”

The Yankees presented a $10,000 check to Irby when the players along with translator Marlon Abreu joined the children for lunch at their school on West 129th Street where principal KiKi Walton looked on joyfully. The kids also received an assortment of books in Yankees carry bags as part of a large donation of reading material to the school and Barbershop Books. The program currently is in place in 11 barbershops — 10 in Manhattan and one in Brooklyn. Irby hopes to expand throughout the city and even beyond its borders.

“The issue of low literacy among children of color is too serious of an issue to wait,” he said. “The children who are coming in here to read when they are waiting or reading while their family members are getting a haircut can’t wait, either. I’m doing anything and everything I can to continue the work and to build those strategic partnerships that are going to allow us to grow, both here in New York City and across the country.”

Beltran’s 1,000th extra-base hit leads the way

Carlos Beltran started Tuesday night from where he left off Monday night with a two-run home run in the first inning coming on the heels of a three-run homer that lifted the Yankees to a 5-2 victory the previous game. His 15th home run of the season was also Beltran’s 1,000th career extra-base hit and started the Yanks toward a 6-3 verdict.

Earlier Tuesday, Beltran was part of the Yankees’ contingent that visited a cancer patient in the North Bronx as part of the HOPE Week initiative. Starlin Castro was also there to help clean Marybell Ruiz’s apartment, and he also homered for the second straight night. Castro, who tied the score Monday night by following Brian McCann’s solo homer with one of his own, struck the right field foul pole with an opposite-field drive in the third inning for his ninth home run to boost the Yankees’ lead to 5-0 over the Angels and David Huff.

The pitcher’s name should be familiar to Yankees fans. Huff pitched for the Yankees in separate stints in 2013 and 2014 and was 6-2 with a 3.18 ERA. Last month he opted out of a minor-league contract with the Royals to sign with the Angels and drew the starting assignment in place of righthander Nick Tropeano, who is one of 10 Angels players on the disabled list. Huff is a native of Huntington Beach, Calif., in the Halos’ backyard near Anaheim.

After Beltran’s homer in the first inning, the Yankees added a run with help from Angels third baseman Yunel Escobar, who in forgetting how many outs there were lost a shot at a double play. Austin Romine made him pay with an RBI single. Rob Refsnyder, who is looking better and better each day at first base, had a sacrifice fly in the second aided by another Angels error, by Huff on an off-line throw to first base.

On the pitching end, the Yankees received encouraging efforts from starter Michael Pineda and reliever Dellin Betances. Pineda limited the Angels to one hit through the first four innings before hitting a pothole in the fifth as the Halos put up three runs on an RBI single by Gregorio Petit and a two-run home run by Kole Calhoun. Pineda came off the mat, however, and set the Angels down in order in both the sixth and seventh.

A key stolen base by Brett Gardner with two out in the seventh set the stage for an insurance run on a single to right by Alex Rodriguez.

Betances, who had been scored upon in his previous four outings, had a 1-2-3 eighth with two strikeouts. Andrew Miller worked the ninth and one night after earning his third victory without a loss he notched his seventh save.

HOPE Week: ‘Cleaning for a Reason’


Joe and Lena Girardi with Marybell Ruiz in her living room.

There was more that one cleanup hitter in the Yankees’ lineup that visited a woman battling colon cancer as part of the HOPE Week initiative Tuesday to do some housework in connection with Cleaning for a Reason, a service to cancer patients.

Manager Joe Girardi and his daughter, Lena, arrived on site with second baseman Starlin Castro and outfielders Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran prepared to help tidy up the one-bedroom apartment in the North Bronx. Marybell Ruiz had expected Evelyn Rodriguez from the Spotless Service to make her scheduled visit and was stunned to see who came along with her.

“I am a lifelong Yankees fan,” Marybell said. “Derek Jeter and Joe Girardi are my two favorites. When Joe took over the team [as manager] I was so happy.”

Girardi took over this team as well. He instructed his players to get to work in the kitchen while he and Lena toiled with mops and dusters in the living room. When Marybell and her husband Flavio said their son Messiah and daughter Amaya were in school, Girardi suggested they go get them and bring them home to meet the players and off they went.

“This is weird,” Amaya said later at the apartment. “It is like a dream.”

Among the cleaning unit was Debbie Sardone, founder and president of Cleaning for a Reason, which offers complimentary monthly house cleanings to women who are undergoing cancer treatments. The organization is an outgrowth of Buckets and Bows Maid Service, which Sardone started in 2003 in Lewisville, Texas. Sardone recalled receiving a phone call from a woman who sought a quote for service but said she could not afford it because she was undergoing cancer treatment.

That convinced Sardone to form Cleaning for a Reason, which in the past decade has helped more than 21,000 cancer patients through more than 1,200 cleaning companies across North America. Each cleaning service volunteers time and staff to clean two homes per month, free of cost. Once matched with a local outlet such as Spotless Service, each patient is eligible to have her house cleaned once a month for up to four months while she is going through treatment.

Marybell Ruiz, 34, underwent a chemotherapy session the day before the Yankees paid their visit. She was diagnosed last year with Stage 4 colon cancer, the same disease that took her mother at the age of 28 and also claimed the lives of her grandmother and two aunts.

“It is a genetic condition in my family,” Marybell said. “Amaya is only nine years old and has already been checked regularly.”

“Cleaning the bathroom is most difficult for patients, scrubbing down shower walls and cleaning toilets,” Sardone said. “It helps to get them back in control of their lives when the house looks and smells cleaner.”

“What they are doing is great,” Beltran said. “It is important to help other people.”

Starlin Castro, Carlos Beltran and Jacoby Ellsbury in the kitchen with Evelyn Rodriguez.

HOPE Week: ‘Stars for Cars’


Nick Goody,  Chase Headley, Brett Gardner, Jake Gallin, Brian McCann, Jennifer Steinbrenner Swindal, Mariano Rivera.

The eighth annual HOPE Week got off to a strong start Monday as former Yankees closer and current Yankees Brian McCann, Brett Gardner, Chase Headley and Nick Goody surprised Jake Gallin at New Rochelle City Hall and presented a donation of $10,000 to his Stars for Cars program. The players greeted local U.S. military veterans on the 72nd anniversary of D-Day and roamed the parking lot selling Stars for Cards decals.

In 2011, Jake Gallin, then 8 years old, was watching television on a Thursday afternoon when he became interested in a segment that was running on the Oprah Winfrey Show. First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden were Oprah’s guests that day discussing their nationwide campaign to support military families.

The First Lady talked about the sacrifices that “Blue Star” and “Gold Star” families make – Blue Star for families with members currently serving and Gold Star for those who lost family members in combat. She spoke of the difficulties of having a loved one serving in the armed forces and how it is an emotional time for many families.

She further explained how these families go largely unrecognized for all the challenges they endure. The First Lady reminded the audience that one percent of our country protects the other 99 percent of our nation.

Jake became determined to raise awareness of the daily sacrifices that our troops and their families make. Soon after, while riding in the car with his mother, Jake noticed a decal on the car in front on them. He immediately came up with the idea to create magnetic decals to recognize the Blue and Gold Star Families for their service. When he returned home, he started designing the star and choosing the words “We Support Blue Star & Gold Star Military Families” for the decal. At that moment, “Stars for Cars” was officially born.

A family friend set up the website, http://www.starsforcars.org, where customers could purchase the 5.5-inch decals for $10 each. Jake expanded the group’s efforts by sending more than 7,000 letters to schools and government officials to spread the word about the importance of honoring military families. The response was overwhelming, with more than 100 schools in seven states signing on.

“The car decal takes the idea of the Blue and Gold stars and allows you to put it on your car to show your support for the sacrifices of our troops and their families,” Gallin said. “I hope I am having an impact on every single person who hears the announcement or sees a star decal on the car in front of them.”

All of the organization’s proceeds go directly to the USO of Metropolitan New York, which strengthens America’s military service members by keeping them connected to family, home and country, throughout their service to the nation. To date, Stars for Cars has sold thousands of decals and raised approximately $20,000.

Jake, now 14 and an eighth-grade student at Albert Leonard Middle School in New Rochelle, continues his efforts. As a result of his hard work and dedication, Gallin has earned a number of accolades, including being named one of America’s top 10 youth volunteers of 2015 by The Prudential “Spirit of Community Awards.”

“He was just a kid who wanted to help,” said Jake’s father, Tom. “Something like this makes it clear that doing small things in life can make a big difference.”

For more information about Stars for Cars, please contact Tom Gallin, at tgallin@optonline.net or phone (646) 296-4667.

HOPE Week: Vacations for cancer patients

HOPE Week concluded Friday with a visit by Yankees pitchers CC Sabathia, Nathan Eovaldi, Ivan Nova and Adam Warren and infielders Brendan Ryan and Greg Bird, who surprised Frank Squeo at Rockland BOCES in West Nyack, N.Y., to bake cookies with him and his family.

Squeo, 47, was diagnosed with Stage III testicular cancer in 2007. During the months that followed, he began his fight against cancer, undergoing surgery and chemotherapy. Just as troubling to Frank, there were many children who were battling their cancer alongside of him – kids who did not know a life beyond hospitals or their disease. Frank promised himself that when he overcame his illness, he would do something to help these children.

In 2012, the Rockland County resident founded Baking Memories 4 Kids, a non-profit organization that sells chocolate chip cookies during the holiday season. The sales from those cookies fund all-expenses-paid vacations for the families of children with life-threatening illnesses to Give Kids the World Village, an Orlando, Fla., resort designed specifically for children with disabilities and illnesses.

While on their vacations, children and their families have the opportunity to visit any of the Orlando-area amusement parks and receive VIP treatment. If a child falls ill on the trip or is too sick to go out, the amusement park of their choosing brings the excitement to them at the resort.
Strictly by word of mouth Frank and local volunteers sold more than 3,000 batches of cookies during their first holiday season in 2012. They were able to more than double their sales in their second season.

In less than three years, Frank has processed more than 10,000 cookie orders and sent 10 families to Orlando on their dream vacation. In 2015, they have committed to sending nine more families.

Prior to Friday’s game against the Indians, the Yankees will team with Baking Memories 4 ids to help surprise Noah Diaz and his family with an all-expenses-paid vacation. Noah Diaz is a four-year-old who suffers from a rare heart defect and Kabuki syndrome.

HOPE Week: Special needs cheerleaders

The Yankees might try an alternative for the YMCA break between the sixth and seventh innings at Yankee Stadium. How about some players coming on to the field and doing a cheerleaders routine, complete with pom-poms?

Several Yankees players proved adept at such an exercise Thursday when they surprised the Hunterdon Huskies Contender Cheerleaders at the Jawonio Center in New City, N.Y., as part of the club’s HOPE Week initiative.

Coached by instructor Debbie House and the girls themselves, pitchers Andrew Miller, Michael Pineda, Chasen Shreve and Chris Capuano, catcher John Ryan Murphy and third base coach Joe Espada showed off some deft moves in doing a few of the squad’s regular routines. The Yankees players were joined by the Prime Time Players — the wrestling duo of Darren Young and Titus O’Neil, who are the reigning WWE tag team champions.

Before the Yankees’ contingent arrived, the cheerleaders went through their paces in a practice session in front of relatives and friends that drew wild applause. The girls wanted to be letter perfect for their guests from the Bronx.

The idea of the Hunterdon Huskies Contender Cheerleaders was born in the mind of House five years ago as the result of watching a national cheerleading competition on television at her home in Clinton Township, N.J. House noticed that there were teams of special needs cheerleaders performing between the competitive routines.

Although she does not have a special needs child, House has a passion for helping children who must persevere through Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and autism and saw in cheerleading a potential outlet for local young girls in similar circumstances. She approached officials from the Hunterdon Huskies cheerleading program to gauge interest in creating their own special needs team. The organization welcomed the idea and decided to create a team for the following year with House serving as head coach.

There were six girls in the first year of the program that is based in High Bridge, N.J. More girls joined up over succeeding years and the current squad is an even dozen students of high-school age. The Contender Cheerleaders are one of five such squads within the Huskies organization, which also sponsors eight football teams, including one for special needs boys.

Each August, the Contender team begins its season with bi-weekly practices and performs at Huskies home football games at Union Forge Park. They will make a trip in December to the 2015 American Youth Cheer National Championships in Kissimmee, Fla.

Overcome with emotion at the appearance of the Yankees, House said, “I could never imagine anything better.”

Her cheerleaders surely feel the same way about her program.

HOPE Week: Students pack kits for disadvantaged

At the start of the 2014-15 academic year, Robert Gardella, principal of the Southern Boulevard School in Chatham Township, N.J., embraced that core concept and adapted the HOPE Week initiative for his school. Principal Gardella, along with the school’s Parent Teacher Organization, wanted to reorganize the school’s service projects by taking inspiration from the Yankees’ HOPE Week.

Throughout the week of Nov. 17-21, 2014, kindergartners created weekend snack kits for low-income children who participate in the free lunch program. First-graders made care packages with essentials like diapers, baby wipes and other toiletries for infants from disadvantaged families in the local community.

Second-graders were tasked with making no-sew fleece blankets for Project Linus, an organization that provides blankets for children in need, whether it’s from illness, homelessness or abuse. Third-graders made “Holiday Hope Chests,” which consisted of decorated shoe boxes filled with small toys and art supplies which were distributed to children in local shelters during the holiday season.

Dozens of Southern Boulevard School students were at Yankee Stadium Wednesday to meet and spend time with outfielder Carlos Beltran, shortstop Didi Gregorius, pitcher Luis Severino and bench coach Rob Thompson, who thanked them for their service to the community.

Principal Gardella, accompanied by students Claire O’Rourke and Bennett Polomeni, threw out the ceremonial first pitch before the Yankees’ game against the Twins. After the game, the students and the Yankees players were to enjoy an ice cream party in the press conference room at the Stadium.

The school also encouraged students to apply the HOPE Week sentiment at home by seeking out items that could be donated to different causes. They created “Caring Corners” in the school, where students could bring in items to donate. One corner benefitted Jersey Coats, which assists families with coats during the cold winter months. Students also collected pennies for the Pennies of Peace program, which provides school supplies for children in impoverished communities overseas. The participation in this program is designed to broaden students’ horizons by teaching them about the impact they can make on a global scale.

By getting everyone involved—from the office staff, to the teachers, to the students and their families — the Southern Boulevard School used inspiration from the Yankees to show their students the internal rewards that come from making a difference in the lives of others.

Posada, Pettitte to be honored during homestand

The Yankees were back at Yankee Stadium Monday night for the start of a long homestand. The 10-game stretch will feature a three-game series against the Twins (Monday and Tuesday nights and Wednesday afternoon, a four-game set against the Indians Thursday and Friday nights and Saturday and Sunday afternoons and a three-game series against the Astros next Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights.

As part of separate pregame ceremonies prior to the scheduled 1:05 p.m. games against the Indians on Saturday and Sunday, respectively, the Yankees will honor Jorge Posada and Andy Pettitte by unveiling Monument Park plaques recognizing their careers. Additionally, Posada’s uniform No. 20 and Pettitte’s uniform No. 46 will be retired by the organization. Former teammates, coaches and other guests will take part in the festivities. Gates will open two hours prior to first pitch at 11 a.m. on both days, and fans are encouraged to arrive early and be in their seats by 12 noon.

Posada spent each of his 17 major league seasons with the Yankees from 1995-2011. He batted .273 with 900 runs, 379 doubles, 275 home runs and 1,065 RBI in 1,829 games and 6,092 at-bats. As a player on five World Series championship teams (1996, ‘98, ‘99, 2000, ‘09), Posada finished his career among baseball’s all-time postseason leaders in games (second, 125), doubles (third, 23) and hits (fourth, 103). His 119 postseason contests as a catcher are the most all time. A five-time American League All-Star and Silver Slugger Award winner (each in 2000-03, ’07), Posada twice finished in the top 10 in AL Most Valuable Player balloting — third in 2003 and sixth in 2007.

Pettitte pitched in 15 seasons with the club (1995-2003, ’07-10 and ’12-13). He had a 219-127 record with a 3.94 ERA and 2,020 strikeouts in 447 games (438 starts) and 2,796 1/3 innings. The lefthander is the franchise leader in strikeouts, is tied with Whitey Ford for most starts and trails only Ford (236 victories, 3,171 innings) and Red Ruffing (231 victories, 3,168 innings) in winning decisions and innings pitched for the Yankees. The three-time AL All-Star (1996, 2001 and ’10) is the only pitcher drafted by the Yankees to win 200 games in the majors. As a Yankees pitcher, Pettitte was 18-10 with a 3.76 ERA (251.1IP, 105ER) in 40 career postseason starts and 251 1/3 innings and is the organization’s all-time playoff leader in victories, starts, innings pitched and strikeouts (167).

The seventh annual HOPE Week (Helping Others Persevere & Excel) will run from Monday through Friday. The initiative is a unique week-long community program that brings to light five remarkable stories intended to inspire individuals into action in their own communities. Since its inception in 2009, the Yankees have recognized more than 30 different 501(c)3 organizations as part of HOPE Week.

Each day over the five-day stretch, the Yankees will reach out to an individual, family or organization worthy of recognition and support, surprising honorees with a day celebrating their accomplishments. Outreach will often take place away from the Stadium, which will allow the Yankees to connect personally with individuals in settings that highlight their greatest successes.

Ticket specials will run on Monday, Aug. 17 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 18 (Military Personnel Game); Wednesday, Aug. 19 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game); Thursday, Aug. 20 (Military Personnel Game); Monday, Aug. 24 (Military Personnel Game); Tuesday, Aug. 25 (Military Personnel Game), and Wednesday, Aug. 26 (MasterCard Half-Price/Senior Citizen/Student/Youth/Military Personnel Game).

For a complete list of ticket specials, including game dates, seating locations, and terms and conditions, fans should visit http://www.yankees.com/ticketspecials. Please note that all ticket specials are subject to availability.

The homestand will also feature the following promotional items and dates:

Monday, August 17 – Yankees vs. Twins, 7:05 p.m.
* Frank Sinatra Music Download Card Night, presented by Universal Music, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Wednesday, August 19 – Yankees vs. Twins, 1:05 p.m.
* Yankees Coloring Book Day, presented by Party City, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Thursday, August 20 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Microfiber Cloth Night, presented by The Parking Spot, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Friday, August 21 – Yankees vs. Indians, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Water Bottle Night, presented by Budweiser, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 21 and older.

Saturday, August 22 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Jorge Posada Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Sunday, August 23 – Yankees vs. Indians, 1:05 p.m.
* Andy Pettitte Collector Card Day, presented by Yankees-Steiner Collectibles, to all in attendance.

Monday, August 24 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Jacoby Ellsbury Bobblehead Night, presented by AT&T, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Tuesday, August 25 – Yankees vs. Astros, 7:05 p.m.
* Yankees Cap Night, presented by Cooper Tire, to the first 18,000 in attendance.

Wednesday, August 26 – Yankees vs. Astros, 1:05 p.m.
* Mark Teixeira Poster Day, presented by Catch 24 Advertising, to the first 18,000 in attendance, 14 and younger.

Tickets may be purchased online at http://www.yankees.com, http://www.yankeesbeisbol.com, at the Yankee Stadium Ticket Office, via Ticketmaster phone at (877) 469-9849, Ticketmaster TTY at (800) 943-4327 and at all Ticket Offices located within Yankees Clubhouse Shops. Tickets may also be purchased on Yankees Ticket Exchange at http://www.yankees.com/yte, the only official online resale marketplace for Yankees fans to purchase and resell tickets to Yankees games. Fans with questions may call (212) YANKEES [926-5337] or email tickets@yankees.com.

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