Results tagged ‘ Nathan Eovaldi ’

Eovaldi to have Tommy John surgery, out til 2018

The injury that forced Nathan Eovaldi out of his last start in the first inning a week ago at Boston proved very serious. Eovaldi has torn the flexor tendon in his right, pitching arm off the bone and damaged the ulnar collateral ligament in his throwing elbow to the extent that he will require Tommy John surgery for the second time in his career.

What that means for the Yankees is that Eovaldi is not likely to pitch for them again until 2018. The rehabilitation period for flexor tendon surgery is three to six months but coupled with a second Tommy John surgery Eovaldi will be looking at a recovery stint of up to 18 months.

“It’s a huge blow,” Eovaldi said before Tuesday night’s Yankees-Blue Jays game at Yankee Stadium. “It’s my second one, so it’s a big deal. Hopefully everything goes well with the surgery and I work hard to get back.”

Eovaldi’s contract is under the Yankees’ control through 2017 when he is arbitration-eligible.

“It wasn’t a particular pitch or something like that,” Eovaldi said of his most recent injury. “I just felt a little pinch every time I threw a fastball. After the first inning [last week], my velocity was down a little bit, but I didn’t feel like there was anything to really worry about. But then I got the MRI, and when I got the results, I was really surprised to see that I had torn the flexor tendon off the bone and damaged my UCL.”

Eovaldi, who had his first Tommy John surgery nine years ago when he was 17 years old and in high school, had one victory since May 29. He was 6-2 with a 3.71 ERA 10 starts into the season but watched his record drop to 9-8 with a 4.76 ERA.

Sanchez’s big night justifies Girardi’s decision

The Alex Rodriguez apologists in the media got all over Yankees manager Joe Girardi for not starting the soon-to-be-released designated hitter Wednesday night at Fenway Park against Red Sox lefthander Drew Pomeranz.

Girardi simply felt the Yankees had a better chance with rookie Gary Sanchez in the DH spot. So was the skipper wrong? All Sanchez did was get four hits, including his first major league home run, to help fortify a Yankees’ comeback from a 4-1 deficit for a startling 9-4 victory in a nine-inning marathon that took four hours and 15 minutes to complete due primarily to 13 pitching changes combined for both teams.

A-Rod did get an at-bat in the turnaround inning for the Yanks, the five-run seventh that included a hit and a run scored by Sanchez. Rodriguez batted for Aaron Hicks with two on and none out and the Yankees down by two runs. A-Rod flied out to deep right field with Sanchez crossing to third base. A strikeout of Brett Gardner appeared to put a stake in the heart of the rally, but RBI singles by Jacoby Ellsbury and Chase Headley and a clutch, two-run double by Starlin Castro thrust the Yankees into the lead.

They added three runs in the eighth with Sanchez leading off with a bomb to center field. The other two runs scored on two of reliever Robbie Ross’ three wild pitches.

On the negative side for the Yanks, starter Nathan Eovaldi had to come out of the game after one inning because of right elbow soreness, which forced Girardi to go deep into his bullpen using seven relievers.

With Eovaldi out of the game, the official scorer has the discretion of awarding the winning decision to an effective reliever and chose Tyler Clippard, who allowed four base runners (three hits and one intentional walk) but no runs. My choice would have been Adam Warren, who set down the six batters he faced with two strikeouts.

With all the moves the Yankees have made this month, Warren has been somewhat overlooked. He went to the Cubs over the winter in the Castro trade and was reacquired last month in the deal that sent Aroldis Chapman to Wrigleyville. Since his return to the Yankees, Warren has retired 26 of 32 batters in nine scoreless innings during which he has yielded four hits and two walks with eight strikeouts.

A-Rod watchers will be happy to see that Boston’s change in a starting pitcher from previously-scheduled knuckleballer Steven Wright to Eduardo Rodriguez Thursday night did not change the manager’s mind about the DH spot. A-Rod will be in their against E-Rod (no relation). The computer did not work against A-Rod, either. He entered the game a .385 career hitter with a double and a home run in 13 at-bats against his namesake. Sanchez was also in the starting lineup behind the plate with fellow catcher Austin Romine at first base giving a breather to Mark Teixeira.

As for Friday night at Yankee Stadium against the Rays to open a six-game homestand when Rodriguez will play his final game for the Yankees he will again be the DH. Rodriguez told a radio audience Friday that his request to play third base one last time was rejected by Girardi.

Who can blame the manager? Rodriguez has not worn a glove on the field since May 23 last year when he played one inning at first base in a 15-4 loss to the Rangers at the Stadium. A-Rod’s most recent game at third base was May 19 last year for three innings in an 8-6, 10-inning loss at Washington.

A-Rod has not earned starting nod

Alex Rodriguez has had a hard time getting in the Yankees’ starting lineup the past two weeks. Thursday night in Game 4 of the Subway Series seemed to be his best chance of cracking into the lineup because Bartolo Colon was the starting pitcher for the Mets.

To say A-Rod has owned “Big Sexy” in his career is a huge understatement. In 52 career at-bats against Colon, Rodriguez has batted .442 with seven doubles, one triple and eight home runs.

Yet when manager Joe Girardi posted his lineup, there was no Rodriguez in it. For the second straight night, the designated hitter role was filled by Gary Sanchez, the Yankees’ prized catching prospect who was recently recalled from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Sanchez got his first major-league hit, a single to center field in the seventh inning, as part of a 1-for-4 game Wednesday night in the Yankees’ 9-5 victory.

Sanchez had two more hits Thursday night in the 4-1 loss to the Mets that turned this year’s Subway Series into a push as each club won two games. Sanchez scored the Yankees’ run in the seventh. He doubled with one out off Colon and scored on a two-out single by Aaron Hicks off reliever Jerry Blevins. Sanchez beat out an infield single in the ninth off Mets closer Jeurys Familia (38th save) to bring the potential tying run to the plate before Rob Refsnyder grounded into a game-ending double play.

Otherwise, it was all Mets, due largely to Colon (10-6), the 43-year-old marvel who gave up one run, six hits and no walks with one strikeout in 6 1/3 innings. Yankees starter Nathan Eovaldi (9-8) had one bad inning in seven — the fifth — but it was a brutal one.

Kelly Johnson led off with a Yankee Stadium right field porch home run. One out later, Curtis Granderson doubled to left-center. Eovaldi then made a pivotal mistake on a check-swing grounder to the mound by Alejandro De Aza by throwing to second base in an attempt to cut down Granderson, but he slid back into the bag safely, costing the Yanks a possible sure out at first base.

After Neil Walker lined out, Jay Bruce, obtained earlier this week in a trade from the Reds, made his first contribution to the Mets with a three-run home run to right-center. Bruce had been 0-for-10 with four strikeouts since joining the Mets before that homer, his 26th, that raised his National League leading RBI total to 83.

Girardi acknowledged that Rodriguez’s statistics against Colon were “tremendous,” but also pointed out “most of those numbers came many, many years ago.”

Indeed, A-Rod ran up those stats against Colon in the previous decade while he was winning three American League Most Valuable Player Awards against a pitcher who copped an AL Cy Young Award, in 2005 with the Angels. Girardi added that when Rodriguez last faced Colon, in 2012, he was 1-for-6.

As frustrated as Rodriguez may be, at 41 he has not shown much at the plate to warrant his playing regularly. A-Rod started the first five games after the All-Star break and batted .188 with one home run and one RBI in 16 at-bats. He has started once in the past 12 games and struck out four times in that game. Rodriguez has one hit, a single, in his past 19 at-bats as his season batting average has shrunk to .204 with nine homers and 29 RBI in 216 at-bats. He has been stuck at 696 career home runs since July 18.

In defending his decision not to start Rodriguez against Colon, Girardi said most of his problems have come against right-handed pitching. True enough, A-Rod is hitting .196 against righties this year. Wednesday night, he also sat against a left-handed starter, Steven Matz, but Rodriguez has not exactly lit it up against lefties, either (.219).

Girardi denied that he was being told by the front office not to play Rodriguez, who is under contract through the 2017 season. And despite reports suggesting that the Yankees have discussed releasing Rodriguez and eating the $27 million due him over the remainder of his contract, general manager Brian Cashman told ESPN Radio there have been no such talks.

“First and foremost, you just have to flat-out admit, it is not easy to eat — meaning release — that kind of money,” Cashman said. “It’s not something you come to a quick decision on. You see players — and I don’t want to name them because they are still playing — but there are players around the game who are on big contracts that have been well-below-average players now for many years, not just a year. Alex hit 33 home runs last year. This is a bigger media market and more attention, and there is certainly a tempest about what should be done. All I can tell you is, slow down a little bit and here is the counterarguments: There is a very large financial commitment through next year on a player of Alex’s caliber that was productive as early as last year.”

The financial considerations are for the front office to worry about. That is not the manager’s concern. He has to put the players in the lineup that give his team the best chance to win. It has been some time since Rodriguez fit into that equation.

I remember years ago talking to a manager who had an aging superstar on his team. The manager said, “The best piece of advice I got from a managing mentor of mine was not to argue with your general manager over the 25th player on the roster and try not to let a star fall on you.”

It is one of the most difficult assignments for any manager, to find a way for a player well past his prime to maintain his dignity while dealing with severely diminished skills.

Also missing from the lineup was Mark Teixeira, who had a big game Wednesday night (three-run home run, two walks, hit by a pitch). The HBP by Matz left Tex with a bruised left shin.

Earning a return to the rotation was Luis Severino, who got his first victory of the season for not allowing an earned run in 4 1/3 innings in relief of Chad Green, who was optioned to SWB. Severino will start next Tuesday night at Boston.

Rays have shown more life than Yankees

As the non-waiver trade deadline looms, the Yankees are trying to let their front office know what kind of team they are, but a recent push into possible contender status has encountered a detour in St. Petersburg, Fla.

The last-place, going-nowhere Rays have stung the Yankees the past two nights at Tropicana Field to win a series the Bombers considered vital to determine whether they would be buyers or sellers by Monday’s trade deadline.

This series in microcosm was detailed in the seventh inning. Rays center fielder Kevin Kiermaier caught the Yankees napping and essentially stole a run. His trek around the bases made it appear that the game was more important to Tampa Bay despite it being 20 games under .500.

What seemed to be a one-out single by Kiermaier became a double when he took advantage of a flat-footed Carlos Beltran in right field and an out-of-position shortstop Didi Gregorius around the bag at second. Continuing to hustle, Kiermaier stole third off reliever Anthony Swarzak, who paid scant attention to the runner and not giving catcher Austin Romine a chance to throw Kiermaier out.

Steven Souza Jr. then lined a single to left-center to send in Kiermaier and push the Rays’ lead to 4-2. Tim Beckham made it 6-2 by crushing a ball over the center field wall, Tampa Bay’s third home run of the game and fifth of the series that ends Sunday afternoon.

Nathan Eovaldi, who lost for the first time since July 1, gave up only three hits, but two of them were home runs. Brad Miller, who tripled and doubled Friday night, turned around a 99-mph heater from Eovaldi in the first inning.

After Brett Gardner gave the Yankees the lead in the third with a two-run home run off lefthander Drew Smyly, Eovaldi gave it right back when .169-hitting catcher Curt Casali homered off a hanging slider following a leadoff single by Beckham.

Smyly was just as stingy as Eovaldi. The lefthander gave up four hits over six innings and ended a personal seven-game losing streak with his first winning decision in 12 starts since May 16.

With a lefty starting against the Yankees, manager Joe Girardi put Alex Rodriguez in the starting lineup for the first time in eight days and got nothing in return. A-Rod struck out in all four of his plate appearances.

Rodriguez’s batting average is down to .206. His wilting offense is not something just of recent vintage, either. Over the past calendar year since August 2015, A-Rod in 397 at-bats has hit .199 with 13 doubles, 18 home runs, 54 RBI and 123 strikeouts.

On the plus side for the Yanks, Chase Headley had two hits, including his 10th home run, a solo shot in the eighth off Matt Andriese, and Adam Warren retired the three batters he faced in the eighth, which may have been an inning too late to bring him into the game.

Kiermaier continued to torture the Yankees in the eighth with a dazzling, leaping catch high atop the center field fence to rob Romine of a potential extra-base hit right after the Headley homer.

Buyers? Sellers? How about winners?

Take heart, Yankees fans, your club may just get in this race for a post-season berth after all. All this debate about whether they Yankees should be buyers or sellers at the Aug. 1 non-waiver trade deadline could rage for another two weeks.

For the second straight night, the Yanks showed Baltimore they are not ready to be buried in the standings. A 7-1 victory pushed the Yanks’ record above .500 at 47-46 and within 6 1/2 games of the Orioles in the American League East standings. That is not an insurmountable deficit with 10 weeks remaining on the schedule.

As I mentioned in an earlier posting, if the Yankees were going to be taken seriously as a contender they had to start playing better within their division. Three straight victories over AL East clubs on this homestand is a nice start.

The Yanks’ keystone combination of second baseman Starlin Castro and shortstop Didi Gregorius were the chief architects of this victory. Each had two hits and scored two runs with Castro driving in four runs.

Gregorius had a premium at-bat with two out in the second inning against Orioles starter Vance Worley. After falling behind 0-2, Gregorius worked the count full and won a 10-pitch duel with a walk. Castro then crushed a 3-1 pitch to left field for his 11th home run. The Yankees pushed their lead to 3-0 in the fifth on an RBI single by Jacoby Ellsbury, but he was thrown out at third base later in the inning trying to advance all the way to third base from first base on a ball that eluded catcher Caleb Joseph.

An extra run would have come in handy in the sixth when the wheels fell off for Nathan Eovaldi, who had been banished to the bullpen two weeks ago but worked his way back into the rotation with 7 2/3 innings of scoreless relief. Eovaldi was pretty effective for the most part Tuesday night. He got 12 outs in a row before he walked Ryan Flaherty with one down in the sixth.

A single up the middle by Adam Jones and a well-struck double to left by Joey Rickard produced a run and spelled major trouble for Eovaldi, who then walked Manny Machado to load the bases for major-league home run leader Mark Trumbo.

Anthony Swarzak came on and got two foul pop-ups to get the Yankees out of the jam. First baseman Rob Refsnyder made a dazzling catch down the right field line of Trumbo’s towering fly. Gregorius ran down Jonathan Schoop’s floater down the left field line.

“He made quality pitches,” manager Joe Girardi said of Swarzak. “He went right after hitters.”

Gregorius and Castro were at it again in the bottom of the sixth as the Yankees added two more runs. One out after a leadoff walk to Brian McCann by Orioles reliever Odrisamer Despaigne, Gregorius lined a single to left. Castro followed with a smoking liner to right-center for a two-run double.

Chase Headley put on the finishing touch with a two-run home run in the eighth off Mychal Givens.

The Yankees clearly won the bullpen game in this one and did so without having to use Dellin Betances or Andrew Miller or Aroldis Chapman. While the Orioles’ pen allowed four earned runs in 3 2/3 innings, the Yankees’ Swarzak and Nick Goody combined for 3 2/3 hitless innings with five strikeouts.

Chapman lighting up jugs gun in record figures

Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman had the Yankee Stadium crowd ooing and ahhing in the ninth inning of Monday night’s 2-1 victory over the Orioles as he threw the five fastest pitches ever tracked by MLB Statcast. They ranged in speeds of 104.0 to 105.1 miles per hour.

Chapman’s 105.1-mph fastball, on the sixth pitch to J.J. Hardy, matched his major-league-record 105.1-mph fastball that was clocked by FanGraphs’ PITCHf/x Sept. 24, 2010 with the Reds against the Padres at San Diego’s Petco Park. Statcast reports that Chapman has a majors-leading 217 pitches of at least 100 mph this season. The next most is 73 by the Braves’ Mauricio Cabrera. According to Statcast, 46.1 percent of Chapman’s 471 total pitches have hit triple digits.

One of Chapman’s No Runs DMC partners, Andrew Miller, had his franchise record streak of consecutive relief appearances with at least one strikeout end at 28, the longest by a major-league reliever since the Indians’ Cody Allen had 29 in a row from Sept. 29 through July 8 last year.

Miller pitched the eighth inning Monday night and retired Manny Machado on a tap to the mound, gave up a single to right-center by Mark Trumbo and got Matt Wieters on a 6-4-3 double play. The DP may be a pitcher’s best friend, but in this case it cost Miller a chance to extend his streak. He will just have to start a new one.

The trio of Chapman, Miller and Dellin Betances has combined for a 2.02 ERA with 26 walks and 191 strikeouts in 15 2/3 innings.
The Yankees are 18-1 when all three pitch in the same game. In those 19 games, No Runs DMC has teamed to post a 1.21 ERA with 16 walks and 90 strikeouts in 59 1/3 innings and held hitters to a .138 batting average in 203 at-bats.

Carlos Beltran went 3-for-4 Monday night, his ninth game this season with at least three hits. He has had three such games in his past 10 games and six his past past 24. Beltran has a slash line of .379/.419/.552 (33- for-87) with 10 runs, six doubles my three home runs, 14 RBI, five walks and a hit by pitch in 24 games and 87 at-bats since April 20.

One off Beltran’s three hits Monday night was a double, career No. 523 to tie Hall of Famer Willie Mays for 45th place on the all- time list. Next up at 524 is Ken Griffey Jr., who will be inducted into the Hall of Fame this coming weekend. In 43rd place at 525 is yet another Hall of Famer, Ted Williams. Beltran has 15 seasons with at least 20 doubles, which is tied with Chili Davis for fifth most by a switch hitter in the modern era. The only switch hitters with more such seasons are Eddie Murray (20), Chipper Jones and Pete Rose (18 each) and Roberto Alomar (16).

Alex Rodriguez’s ninth home run of the season and 696th of his career was his 1,758th hit with the Yankees, which broke a tie with Wally Pipp for 17th place on the franchise’s career hit list. A-Rod has 69 career home runs against the Orioles, his second most against any opponent, topped only by the 70 he has slugged against the Angels.

Nathan Eovaldi, back in the rotation to start Tuesday night, is averaging 97.1 mph on his fastball this season, according to FanGraphs’ PITCHf/x, which is the highest average velocity in the American League and the second highest in the majors only to the Mets’ Noah Syndergaard (98.1). Eovaldi earned his way back into the rotation by pitching 7 2/3 scoreless innings in three relief outings.

A-Rod back at 3B? It almost happened

The Yankees nearly pulled off a third consecutive ninth-inning victory Friday night at San Diego to begin the 10-game, three-city trip that takes them to the All-Star break. They made a lot of noise but ended up one run short.

Had they been able to tie the score, it would have been interesting to see how the Yankees would navigated their way in the field in subsequent innings. Alex Rodriguez, for example, would have played third base for the first time since 2013. He was excited about the prospect and was wearing his glove as he stood on the dugout steps when Brett Gardner made the final out of the 7-6 loss.

Stranded at third base was Carlos Beltran, who was not supposed to play against the Padres because of a sore right hamstring. He was not needed to play in the outfield, but A-Rod was needed at third base because manager Joe Girardi had already used Chase Headley, Ronald Torreyes and Rob Refsnyder.

Rodriguez and Beltran had big pinch hits in the four-run ninth. Rodriguez singled home a run and eventually came around to score on an infield out by Aaron Hicks. After Didi Gregorius scored on a wild pitch by Brandon Maurer to make it a one-run game, Beltran doubled to left-center. Girardi considered using pitcher Masahiro Tanaka as a pinch runner but kept Beltran in the game. He hobbled to third base on a grounder to the right side by Jacoby Ellsbury before Gardner ended the rally.

The Yankees caught a break that inning because the day before the Padres traded closer Fernando Rodney, who was having a great season, to the Marlins. Matt Thornton, who pitched for the Yankees a couple of years ago, opened the gates by walking Brian McCann on four pitches and hitting Starlin Castro with a 2-2 pitch before yielding the single against the shift to Rodriguez. That was career hit No. 3,110 for A-Rod, who tied Hall of Famer Dave Winfield for 19th place on the all-time list. Winfield happened to be at Petco Park to witness the hit.

Prior to the ninth, the Yankees experienced a stretch of 18 batters in which only one reached base — McCann with a solo home run (No. 13) in the sixth. Their late rally was an attempt to atone for letting the game get out of hand early, which was due largely to another ineffective outing by Nathan Eovaldi.

The Yankees loaded the bases against Padres starter Colin Rea in the first inning but failed to score. San Diego responded in the bottom half with three runs. The key blow was a two-out, two-run double by Derek Norris. Eovaldi was hurt by the long ball once again as he gave up rookie second baseman Ryan Schimpf’s first career home run in the second and a two-run shot to Wil Myers in the fifth.

Eovaldi was strung for six earned runs in 4 1/3 innings. He is winless in six starts since May 29, a stretch in which he is 0-4 with a 9.20 ERA. The righthander has allowed 31 earned runs and 45 hits, including 12 home runs, in 30 1/3 innings in those starts, this from a pitcher who 10 starts into the season was 6-2 with a 3.71 ERA. That ERA has since climbed to 5.54.

In other developments, Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes‐Barre outfielder Aaron Judge was named the International League Player of the Month for June. Judge batted .343 in 102 at-bats and led the IL with nine home runs, 30 runs and a .477 on-base percentage. He also finished among the top three with 25 RBI, 16 extra‐base hits, 70 total bases, 21 walks and a .686 slugging percentage.

Conversely, Nick Swisher has decided to leave the Triple A club. Swish, who played for the Yankees from 2009-12, was hoping to make a comeback after being released by the Braves in spring training. The Yankees have had openings at first base because of injuries, but Swisher never got the call.

The switch hitter batted .255 with seven homers and 25 RBI in 55 games for SWB. After watching Rob Refsnyder, Chris Parmelee and Ike Davis take turns at first base, Swish decided to go home and spend time with his infant daughter.

“I don’t think we would have signed him if we didn’t want to take a look at him,” Girardi told reporters. “We just felt some guys were ahead of him at the time, so he never was called. I respect what he did. He had another baby, so go and enjoy that.”

Rarified air does not help Yankees

The two-game trip to Denver was supposed to be a soft spot in the Yankees’ schedule. Yeah, right. Despite facing starting pitchers with earned run averages as high as the altitude in Colorado, the Yankees lost both games. Rockies starters Jorge De La Rosa and Chad Bettis were clearly more effective than the Yankees’ Nathan Eovaldi and Ivan Nova.

The Yanks put up a good fight Tuesday night. After falling behind by nine runs through seven innings, the Yankees exploded with a seven-run eighth against the underbelly of the Colorado bullpen, but their own relief corps got roughed up as well in a 13-10 loss, a typical Coors Field score. The Rockies kept it up Wednesday with a 13-hit assault to win, 6-3.

The holes in the batting order did not help. With no designated hitter in a National League park, Alex Rodriguez was reduced to one at-bat as a pinch hitter Tuesday night. With no Carlos Beltran, out with a sore left knee that was drained, or Mark Teixeira, on the 15-day disabled list due to a right knee cartilage tear, the Yankees’ lineup Wednesday featured as its cleanup hitter Chase Headley, who has hit all of three home runs.

All seven of the Yankees’ hits Wednesday were singles. They have just seven extra-base hits (five doubles, one triple, one home run) over their past five games after totaling 21 extra-bases hits (12 doubles, nine homers) in the four-game sweep of the Angels last week.

Coors Field is a place where struggling hitters can improve their statistics, which the Yankees certainly did Tuesday night but less so Wednesday. But for those who thought the Rockies would be easy pickings, it should be pointed out that both clubs entered play Wednesday with the same record — 31-33 — and Colorado is now one game better.

Manager Joe Girardi was justified in getting annoyed with media reports about the 11-game, home-and-home swing this week and next against the Rockies and Twins being a chance for the Yankees to gain ground against sub-par competition. Minnesota may have the worst record in the American League, but that does not mean the Twins intend to roll over and play dead the next four days in Minneapolis or next weekend at Yankee Stadium.

Girardi is correct when he says if the Yankees do not play well it does not matter who the opponent is. And after the recent five-game winning streak at home, the Yankees have now lost four games in a row. In three of those games, starting pitchers allowed five or more runs. Considering the shape of the Yankees’ batting order these days, that is too much to overcome on a regular basis.

Anyone who thought the Rockies were pushover knows nothing about the first five hitters in that lineup. Charlie Blackmon, D.J. LeMahieu, Nolan Arenado, Carlos Gonzalez and Trevor Story combined to go 22-for-43 (.512) with four doubles, one triple, three home runs and 14 RBI with an .860 slugging percentage in the series. Gonzalez’s home run in the eighth inning Tuesday night off Andrew Miller was the first extra-base hit the lefthander has allowed to a left-handed batter all season. The Rockies also scored a run off Aroldis Chapman in the eighth inning Wednesday.

The key to beating Colorado is to bash their pitchers. The Yanks did score 13 runs in two games, but their pitchers could not contain the Rockies, who scored in nine of the 16 innings they batted in the series.

Nova had a string of 24 scoreless innings in inter-league play end when he gave up a run in the third inning. The Yankees took the lead in the fourth on four singles and a throwing error by Rockies catchers Tony Wolters, but Nova was touched for four runs in the fourth that featured a walk and a stolen base by Blackmon, a run-scoring single by LeMahieu, a two-run home run by Arenado, a double by Story, and a two-out, RBI single by Mark Reynolds. Nova had a six-game winning streak in inter-play stopped and is now 8-2 against NL competition.

One bright spot about going to Minneapolis is that the Yankees will be back in the AL with Rodriguez available as the DH. Perhaps Beltran’s knee will allow him to return to the lineup as well. CC Sabathia, who has been the Yankees’ most consistent starting pitcher, draws the first assignment of the series Thursday night at Target Field.

HOPE Week: ‘Blissful Bedrooms’


Alex Rodriguez, Didi Gregorius, Nathan Eovaldi, Aaron Hicks and Aroldis Chapman visit with Said Rivera.

The Yankees concluded HOPE Week Friday with pitchers Nathan Eovaldi and Aroldis Chapman, designated hitter Alex Rodriguez, shortstop Didi Gregorius and outfielder Aaron Hicks raising up their sleeves to do a bedroom makeover for Said Rivera at his home in the Bronx.

Said, 18, loves video games and hanging out with his friends yet was born with tremendous physical challenges. He was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at the age of five months. Said (pronounced sigh-eed) attends a special needs high school in the Bronx and plays on a wheelchair basketball team, but his participation is very limited due to his condition.

The makeover in his bedroom where he is forced to spend the majority of his time was courtesy of Blissful Bedrooms, which transforms the personal spaces of young individuals who have very limited resources and severe physical disabilities that make them wheelchair dependent and highly reliant on others for activities of daily living.

In 2009, Martha and Alex Gold-Dvoryadkin wanted to do something nice for one of Martha’s former physical therapy students. Tamisha, 21, was unable to sit upright, change her position independently or speak aside from some basic sounds. Without an adult facility to take her in, Tamisha spent most of her time in her bedroom.

Eventually, Martha and Alex came up with the idea of sprucing up Tamisha’s bedroom. They purchased supplies and together spent an entire weekend painting, hanging butterflies and applying rainbows. Her father, a single parent, stood and watched his daughter’s reaction with tears in his eyes.

“Our goal for each bedroom is to create a personal sanctuary conceived exclusively for the individual – a safe haven where the young person will feel inspired, protected, stimulated, valued, appreciated and loved,” Martha said. “This is achieved by a collection of talented and motivated volunteers from the community, who create, design and construct a unique environment that is born out of the recipient’s passions, dreams, fantasies and favorite colors.”

Blissful Bedrooms operates with a group of 20-30 volunteers who contribute on each makeover, all of various ages, backgrounds and skills. When the group is able to raise the funds for the next room, they begin the project.

The average cost of each transformation is approximately $6,000 and takes place over an entire weekend – from Friday night through Sunday night, when a reveal celebration is held. A big dinner is made at the residence and prior makeover recipients come to support the event.

Teixeira injury opens possible spot for Refsnyder

Some Yankees fans may have been surprised not to see Rob Refsnyder in the lineup Friday night at Baltimore, the fourth and last stop on the trip. The rookie had a big game Thursday at Detroit (double, single, two runs, one RBI), and the Yankees can use all the offense they can find these days.

Although he was not in the starting lineup, Refsnyder got into the game in the third inning as a replacement at first base for Mark Teixeira, who left because of a right knee injury. Refsnyder had not played first base since college, but he is getting used to moving around the diamond. 

He played the outfield mostly at the University of Arizona but was converted into a second baseman in the Yankees’ minor-league system. During spring training this year Refsnyder played some third base as well but did not take to the position. Since coming up from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre this week Refsnyder has played right field and second base. He has also been working out at first base.

The Yankees have been vulnerable at that position even before Teixeira got hurt. Dustin Ackley is out for the season after undergoing shoulder surgery to repair a torn labrum in his right shoulder. Backup catcher Austin Romine has been used at first base, but he had to catch Friday night because Brian McCann was nursing a hyperextended left elbow.

Teixeira has had a dismal first third of a season (Friday night was game number 54, the one-third mark). The switch hitter is batting .180 with three home runs and 12 RBI in 167 at-bats. At this point a year ago, Tex had 16 homers and 40 RBI while batting .245.

His lack of productivity has been a factor in the Yankees’ woeful offense. They entered play Friday night last in the American League in batting (.232) and tied with the Twins for last in runs (198).

Scoring runs was not as much a problem for the Yankees Friday night as it was preventing them. The Yankees had not homered in the previous three games but took a 4-1 lead against Orioles righthander Chris Tillman on a two-run blast by Carlos Beltran and solo shots by Alex Rodriguez and Austin Romine.

Orioles slugger Chris Davis made the score 4-2 with his 11th homer, in the fourth. Nathan Eovaldi’s string of winning starts ended at five when he lost a 5-2 lead in the sixth. It was the first time in six starts that he failed to get through the sixth inning.

A bases-loaded single by Matt Wieters chased Eovaldi. Kirby Yates got a big strikeout but gave up a two-out double to Jonathan Schoop that tied the score. For his third floor straight appearance, Dellin Betances was scored upon, and the run he gave up in the seventh proved the decider. 

Singles by Adam Jones and Hyun Soo Kim put runners on the corners with none out. A slow grounder along the third base line by Manny Machado was well placed enough for Jones to score as Chase Headley had no other play but to get an out at first base