Results tagged ‘ Shane Greene ’

Jeter was right to wait to celebrate

There is no use trying to avoid what is going on with the Yankees these closing days of the season. A playoff berth remains a mathematical possibility but only by the slimmest of margins. Yanks manager Joe Girardi said at the start of the recent trip to Baltimore and St. Petersburg, Fla., that the Yankees needed to win every game, and they proceeded to lost five of seven.

They returned to Yankee Stadium Thursday night to begin their final homestand of the season. Despite the dire circumstances of the Yanks’ position in the standings, the Stadium had a buzz to it in the crowd that was by no means capacity but was nevertheless enthusiastic.

Perhaps the reason could have something to do with the person playing shortstop for the Yankees. This is Derek Jeter’s last hurrah at the Stadium, and that may be enough to keep the folks in the seats keeping the faith.

The Captain did not disappoint the faithful, either. Coming off a dreadful trip during which he had a hitless string stretch to 28 at-bats, Jeter got the crowd cheering in the first inning when he beat out a grounder to deep shortstop for a single. The assembled got to roar their approval five innings later when DJ ripped a 3-1 knuckleball from R.A. Dickey to right field for a home run, the cap’s first dinger in 158 at-bats since Aug. 1 at Boston.

As fiercely as the crowd reacted to the blow, Jeter declined to take a curtain call, which is typical of him. The homer made the score 2-0 Yankees with too much baseball left in the game to celebrate at that point. He did not go into the dumps when he was 0-for-28, so he was not going to do any flips for hitting his first home run in six weeks. Never too high, never too low; that defines the Captain.

Indeed, the game was not over by any means. Dellin Betances preserved the shutout work by Shane Greene by getting the final out of the seventh, but Shawn Kelley gave up a game-tying home run to Jose Bautista on a 0-2 pitch with two out in the eighth.

Kelley hung his head as Bautista circled the bases on his 33rd homer of the season as well the pitcher should have. After fouling off a 94-mph fastball back to the screen on 0-1, Bautista made a gesture indicating he just missed a pitch he should have creamed. Kelley threw the same pitch on the next delivery to the same spot, and this time Bautista did not miss it but powered into the left field seats.

After Jeter flied out leading off the home eighth, quite a few fans headed for the exits assuming that he would not bat again. They missed a dramatic finish as the Yankees won, 3-2, on a walk-off error.

Chris Young, who seems to be in the middle of what good things the Yankees have done recently, led off the inning against Aaron Sanchez with a single to center. Antoan Richardson ran for Young and promptly stole second base.

With the count 3-0, Brett Gardner surprised the crowd, not to mention Girardi, by attempting to bunt. He fouled off the pitch and the next one as well as the count went full. Gardy tried one more and dropped a two-strike bunt for a sacrifice to get Richardson to third base. Gardner, bunting on his own, told Girardi in the dugout that Sanchez’s ball was running so much he did not think he could pull him.

The Blue Jays brought the infield in and got what they wanted when Chase Headley hit a ground ball to the right side, but first baseman Aaron Lind let the ball get by him that gave the Yankees another day of hope. They gained a game on the Athletics for the second wild-card spot but still trail by five games with 10 to play.

‘Ghosts’ can’t save Yanks on Derek Jeter Day

There was a moment in the first inning Sunday when those ghosts that Derek Jeter used to talk about in the old Yankee Stadium seemed to have found their way to the north side of 161st Street.

Jeter, on first base after a leadoff single, successfully avoided a tag by second baseman Omar Infante after fielding a ground ball by Martin Prado that might have started a double play. Infante then dropped the ball and in flipping it toward second base in an attempt for a face-saving force play hit Jeter in the back. All hands were safe.

Could the Yankees be on their way on Derek Jeter Day to a much-needed victory against the American League Central-leading Royals? Were the ghosts of Ruth and Gehrig and Joe D. and the Mick there to guide them through this special day?

Unfortunately, as it turned out, the answer was no. If there were ghosts out there, they were the wrong ones. The Yankees did not score that inning or the next or any of the innings as Kansas City came away with its second shutout in three days without getting an earned run either time.

“We lost those two games, 1-0 and 2-0, with none of the runs being earned,” manager Joe Girardi said. “That’s the frustrating point.”

Sunday’s loss was due in part to the Yankees playing well below their captain’s standards. Starting pitcher Shane Greene, who has displayed problems when having to throw to bases, was entirely responsible for the KC run in the second inning when he threw a relay to first base into right field. Girardi argued that Nori Aoki was out of the baseline running to first, but Greene’s throw was so wild that the umpire said there was no chance for a play.

The next inning, right fielder Carlos Beltran dropped a fly ball by Alex Gordon, who came around to score despite stumbling near third base because Beltran’s relay home was so far up the first base line that catcher Brian McCann had no shot at Gordon.

This was not the type of baseball that Jeter has embodied over the years for the Yankees, who cannot afford defensive mistakes when their offense so often struggles. They were limited to four hits, all singles, by four Royals pitchers Sunday and got only three runners as far as second base.

Jeter spoke after the game about the strange situation of being honored as a retiring player and yet still having to play. “You appreciate all the support, the nice things people say, but by the same token you still have to play a game,” Jeter said.

The Yankees are going to have to play the game a lot better if Jeter’s final games are to reach into October.

Yanks off to grim start in homestand

It was not the way the Yankees wanted to open the homestand. Starting pitcher Shane Greene, who has pitched well overall for the Yankees, did not have it Tuesday night and left the game in the third inning trailing the Red Sox, 6-0. That put the Yankees in uphill-climb mode the rest of the game and they finished on the south side of a 9-4 score.

And matters got no better after the game when manager Joe Girardi revealed that Martin Prado has an aching left hamstring and will be examined Wednesday by team physician Dr. Chris Ahmad. Prado had two more hits and is batting .292 since coming to the Yankees.

Yet he was also part of the questionable base running that cost the Yankees dearly in the fifth inning when they were putting together a sustained offense. Carlos Beltran got a bad read on a fly ball, and Prado, one of the most alert players in the majors, made a rare rock that put a cramp in the Yankees’ rally.

After Beltran led off the inning with a single, Brian McCann bunted against the shift and dunked a roller to third base for a single. Up came Prado, who had homered off Boston’s Joe Kelly in the third, and hit another rocket to left field that perplexed Yoenis Cespedes as well as Beltran apparently.

Beltran looked as if he thought Cespedes would catch Prado’s drive which went behind the left fielder. Beltran then pranced to third base and stayed there. Meanwhile, Prado, seeing the ball get over Cespedes dashed around first base thinking double all the way and did not notice until it was too late that McCann was at second base because he could not have advanced with Beltran at third. Prado ended up getting tagged out in a rundown. A bit hit became a big out due to hesitant base running.

“It looked like we were getting to [Kelly], and we gave them an out,” Girardi said.

The Yankees clearly had Kelly on the ropes. He walked the next two hitters to force in a run and got lucky when shortstop Xander Bogaerts was standing in the right spot to glove a smoking liner by Jacoby Ellsbury. Upon video review, an inning-ending grounder by Derek Jeter was reversed to an RBI single, but Brett Gardner was called out on strikes.

There can be no reviews of ball/strike calls. If so, Gardner might not have been punched out. He was so sure plate umpire Tim Timmons’ strike-three call was wrong that he slammed his helmet and bat in disgust, which only served to get Gardner ejected.

“I have more self control than that, but I was frustrated,” Gardner said. “I was frustrated by some of the calls in my first two at-bats when I struck out. I felt like it was way outside. He threw me out of the game before I even spoke to him.”

I do not care how justified Brett may be in protesting a borderline call, there is no way a player can get himself thrown out of such a game. For a team like the Yankees hanging by a thread in trying to qualify for a post-season berth, a player, especially one batting third in the order, getting tossed because he lost his temper is inexcusable.

The result was that Gardner was out of the game and Stephen Drew was in. Anybody like that exchange?

The game also featured a statistical rarity. The Yankees did not have a fielding assist. Boston made only one out on the ground, and it was an unassisted play at first base by Mark Teixeira. The Red Sox struck out 12 times and made the other 14 outs in the air.

All Yanks join Ellsbury in hit parade

No sooner had Jacoby Ellsbury reached first base with a leadoff single in the third inning Wednesday night at Detroit that I said to myself, “Anyone else on this team want to help this guy?”

Ellsbury had accounted for both Yankees runs in Tuesday night’s 5-2 loss with solo home runs and opened Wednesday’s game with a single and a stolen base but was stranded at second base.

I do not claim any penchant for mental telepathy, but I may have transmitted something across to the rest of the Yankees because all they did an entire turn through the batting order that inning was follow Ellsbury’s lead and reach base with hits.

It was a manager’s absolute dream as Joe Girardi watched each player he placed in the lineup knock his way on base. Ellsbury’s speed got him a second steal as he outran a pickoff. Derek Jeter brought him home with a double as the parade began, followed by a single by Martin Prado, a double by Mark Teixeira and singles by Carlos Beltran, Brian McCann, Chase Headley, Brett Gardner and Francisco Cervelli. Not only did the Yankees get nine hits in a row but also eight straight with runners in scoring position, which in some cases this year has been a series worth of clutch hits.

And that was no tomato can on the mound off of whom the Yankees got nine consecutive hits, two shy of the Rockies’ major league mark against the Cubs in 2010. The Detroit starter was none other than 2012 American League Cy Young Award winner David Price, who entered the game with a 10-5 career record against the Yankees.

Price never did get an out that inning. Tigers manager Brad Ausmus yanked him for another lefthander, Blaine Hardy, who gave up two more runs on sacrifice flies by Ellsbury and Jeter as the Yankees swelled their lead to 8-0.

Remember how excited the Yankees were Monday night when they scored eight runs against the Royals with James Shields starting? Well, this time they scored that many runs in just one inning.

Ellsbury certainly looks comfortable back in the leadoff spot where he batted most often in his years with the Red Sox. Girardi has had to use him in the 3-hole much of this year because of the inconsistency and injuries to Mark Teixeira and Carlos Beltran.

Usual leadoff man Gardner was out the first two games of the trip because of a right ankle bruise. He was back Wednesday night but dropped to the 8-hole because of his career problems against Price (2-for-20 entering play).

With two hits, two stolen bases and an RBI over his first three plate appearances, Ellsbury definitely was a table setter. Yet for a change he had plenty of support.

As appreciative as Girardi for all this offense was Yanks starter Shane Greene, who did not give up a hit or a run until the fourth inning. The righthander did not pitch as it he had a huge lead but rather as if the score was close, the best approach for a pitcher to take.

Green gave up two runs, five hits and one walk with a hit batter and eight strikeouts in seven innings to remain undefeated in eight starts since July 21 and improve his record to 4-1 with a 3.09 ERA.

The big-inning victory also did the Yanks quite a bit of good in the standings. They picked up a game on the Orioles in the American League East and now trail by six and sliced a game off the deficit for the second wild card spot to 2 1/2 games behind the Mariners and two behind the Tigers.

Jeter’s clutch hit helps Yanks end 5-game losing streak

The Yankees ended a disturbing pattern on this trip in Saturday’s 3-2 victory over the Rays that stopped a five-game losing streak. In the two games at Baltimore that began the trip, the Yankees scored early but failed to add to their lead while the Orioles came back to take each game.

Friday night was different but not in a good way. The Yankees did not give up the lead because they never had one. In fact, they did not score at all.

Saturday was looking like the same thing for a while. The Yanks jumped ahead 2-0 in the second inning against lefthander Drew Smyly on Martin Prado’s sixth home run of the season. Inning after inning went by without the Yankees extending the lead for Shane Greene, who was brilliant with 10 strikeouts in six-plus innings. The Rays scored single runs in the sixth and seventh to tie the score and hang Greene with a no-decision. He was kicking himself for hitting a batter with a pitch to start the seventh. A pinch runner eventually came around to score the tying run.

Then came the ninth, and things started going the Yankees’ way. Brett Gardner led off with an infield single and continued to second base on an errant throw by second baseman Logan Fosythe.

Derek Jeter attempted to bunt Gardner to third base but could not handle lefthander Jake McGee’s high octane gas as the count went to 2-2. Tampa Bay kept its infield tight with the idea that DJ still might bunt despite having two strikes. Nope. The Captain swung away and lined a 99-mph fastball past a diving Forsythe for a single to right-center that brought Gardner home with what proved the winning run.

Pitching for the first time in nine days, David Robertson notched his 32nd save to preserve the victory for Dellin Betances (5-0), who pitched a perfect eighth inning. Shawn Kelley also pitched a shutout seventh as the bullpen had its first strong performance on the trip.

The loss dropped the Rays back under .500 (61-62) after they had gotten to the level level with Friday night’s 5-0 victory, quite a feat for a team that was once 18 games under .500. The last major-league team to go from 18-under to .500 in the same season was the Marlins in 2006 when they were managed by current Yankees skipper Joe Girardi.

He picked a perfect game to put Carlos Beltran back in right field for the first time since May 11 because the way Greene pitched nobody hit the ball to Beltran, who did not have a fielding chance until he caught a drive by Evan Longoria for the first out of the eighth inning.

Beltran’s return to the outfield permits Girardi to go back to his preference of using the designated hitter spot as a way to give players a half-game off. Saturday’s hero, Jeter, was the DH in this one.

Girardi decided against using Brian McCann, who came off the 7-day concussion list, and had Francisco Cervelli behind the plate. McCann had a lackluster workout Friday, so Girardi chose to wait at least one more day before getting his regular catcher back in the mix.

The much-needed victory also guaranteed the Yankees will leave St. Petersburg after Sunday’s game no deeper than third place in the American League East. After the shutout loss Friday night, it created a situation where the Rays could have jumped over the Yankees in the standings this weekend, a prognosis that fell apart with Saturday’s comeback victory.

Yanks pitchers outshine Tigers’ vaunted rotation

When the Yankees-Tigers series began, all the talk was about Detroit’s rotation. The Tigers had lined up against the Yankees three former American League Cy Young Award winners in Max Scherzer, David Price and Justin Verlander and a 13-game winner in Rick Porcello.

Guess what? None of them notched a victory.

Talk centered on the Yankees’ staff after it limited one of the AL’s top offensive clubs to merely six runs over 39 innings in winning three of the four games. The only game Detroit won, a 4-3, 12-inning matchup, did not provide a victory for their starting pitcher, Price, who was out of the game in the ninth.

Yankees starters, meanwhile, were 2-0 with an ERA of 0.99 as the rotation gave up only three earned runs in 27 1/3 innings. Not that the Tigers’ crew was bad. The Detroit starters combined for a 2.42 ERA, which any manager will take over a four-game set, but it was just not a match for the Yankees.

Thursday’s 1-0 victory behind rookie Shane Greene and in front of a sellout Yankee Stadium crowd of 47,013 was a nice finishing touch. Greene pitched one batter into the ninth and scattered five hits and three walks with five strikeouts to improve his record to 3-1 with a 2.89 ERA. He as yanked in the fifth inning of his prior start at Boston but this time came close to his first complete game in the majors. Maybe next time.

“We won” is the best thing Greene took from the game. He is a man of few words and at times seems overwhelmed by his surroundings in the majors — except when he is on the mound. The righthander utilized an effective sinker-slider mix with an occasional four-seam fastball that was never more valuable than in the sixth when it produced a pivotal double play against Victor Martinez, the second half of the Tigers’ 1-2 punch behind two-time AL Most Valuable Player Miguel Cabrera, who was rested until the ninth inning Thursday when he batted as a pinch hitter in the ninth against David Robertson (31st save) with a chance to do damage and ruin Greene’s effort.

Cabrera batted with runners on first and second with none out. He hit a hard grounder past Robertson, but it was gobbled up in front of second base by Brendan Ryan, who stepped on the bag and threw the ball to first base for another crucial double play. Fans gasped when Don Kelly lofted a fly ball in shallow center before Stephen Drew, starting at shortstop for a resting Derek Jeter, put it away for a satisfying final out. Also bailing out Robertson in the Kelly at-bat was catcher Francisco Cervelli, who made two terrific stops of balls in the dirt to keep the potential tying run at third.

Drew was also responsible for the game’s only run with an opposite-field double to left in the fourth off Porcello. The new mix of players up from the minors and the result of trades has given the Yankees a burst of freshness.

“It has changed the complexion of the team,” manager Joe Girardi said. “We have gotten better defensively, and pitchers are giving us more innings.”

Greene’s work allowed over-loaded Shawn Kelley, Adam Warren and Dellin Betances a needed day off. The Yankees had been sputtering at home this year but have turned that around since the All-Star break with 10 victories in 14 games.

“We have talked about needing to play better at home,” Girardi said. “We are doing all the little things. These are the best four starts in a row that we have had all season. Their pitchers were the guys being talked about, but our pitchers did a great job.”

Walk-less marathon a baseball rarity

In Tuesday night’s 4-3, 12-inning Yankees loss to the Tigers, there were no walks and 22 strikeouts (12 by Detroit pitchers and 10 by the Yanks). According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it was the only the fifth time in the past 100 years that a game went at least 12 innings without either club drawing a walk.

The Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates played a 13-inning game without a walk July 25, 1917. The other 12-inning games minus a walk were between the Brewers and the Angels July 5, 1987 at Anaheim, the Cubs and the Dodgers July 27, 1980 at Los Angeles and the Reds and the Pirates Sept. 19, 1959 at Pittsburgh.

The Yankees are now up to 16 consecutive games that have been decided by two or fewer runs. They are 9-7 during the stretch. It is the longest such streak since the Orioles had a similar run in 1975 from Aug. 23-Sept. 7. The last longest such stretch was an 18-game run by Twins in 1968 from May 16-June 3.

The Yankees have used 51 players this season, which ties the 2005 and 2008 clubs for the second highest total in team history. The club record is 56 set last year. This year’s breakdown is 29 pitchers, four catchers, 11 infielders and seven outfielders. There have been 26 players this year who have played for the Yankees for the first time, seven of whom made their major-league debuts (Dean Anna, Shane Greene, Jose Ramirez, Yangervis Solarte, Masahiro Tanaka, Zelous Wheeler and Chase Whitley).

Yanks’ gloves and bats come up empty

Yes, the Yankees committed five errors Monday night, quite an embarrassment in front of a packed house of 45,278 on a night when figurines of Derek Jeter were distributed. Yet in losing to the club with the worst record in the major leagues, the Yanks were at fault more for their bats than their gloves.

Only one of the Rangers’ runs in their 4-2 victory was the direct result of an error by the Yankees. The greater embarrassment for the Yankees was that they managed only merely four hits off the Rangers’ starting pitcher, Miles Mikolas, 25, a righthander making his fourth career start, paired against Shane Greene, also 25, also a righthander, who was making his third career start.

But whereas Greene came into the game with a 2-0 record and 1.32 ERA, Mikolas entered play with a 0-2 mark and 10.05 ERA. This was a projected mismatch, but it went to Mikolas instead. He pitched one out into the eighth inning and got the better of Greene and the Yankees.

Mikolas hurt himself with a balk in the first inning that led to a run on a sacrifice fly by Carlos Beltran. Jacoby Ellsbury stunned the pitcher with a home run leading off the fourth, and the Yankees had a major threat in the fifth when they loaded the bases with one out on singles by Francisco Cervelli and Zelous Weaver and a walk to Brett Gardner.

That brought up Jeter, but Mikolas won the battle as the Captain grounded into a double play. That marked the first two of nine consecutive outs for Mikolas.

Greene had a weird night. He was guilty of three of the errors charged to the Yankees. Two were on bad throws to first base with the other coming on a dropped relay at first base. None cost him a run. A dropped feed from Jeter by second baseman Brian Roberts was costly, however, allowing the first Texas run.

What was costly for Greene with the misplays was that it took him longer to get out of those innings. Yankees manager Joe Girardi pointed out after the game that Greene’s pitch count was 113, but it might have still been in the 80s when he started to have trouble in the sixth.

The Rangers grabbed a 4-2 lead with three runs that inning, all after two were out. A walk to Jim Adduci was a killer for Greene, who then yielded an RBI single by Geovanny Soto. Lefthander Matt Thornton came on and gave up consecutive singles to lefty-swinging Rougned Odor and Shin-Soo Choo.

“It was an ugly game on our part,” Girardi said. “We need to win series if we’re going to catch Baltimore. If you lose the first game, it makes it harder.”

Tough night for Gr-EEE-ne

Watching Shane Greene on the mound Monday night made one wonder how much PFP is done in the minor leagues. PFP stands for pitchers’ fielding practice, an exercise dreaded by hurlers, especially during the heat of spring training.

It is pretty boring stuff, too, but there are times when pitchers are reminded why fielding their position is important. Greene, who has done a terrific job since his recall from Triple A Scranton, had a rough time of it in the third and fourth innings and was charged with three errors. That’s three Es for a guy with three of them in his last name.

Two of the misplays came in the second inning, but he escaped without damage. Greene dropped a feed from first baseman Kelly Johnson that allowed Leonys Martin to reach first base. With two out, Greene fielding a pepper shot by Jim Adduci , but his under-handed toss sailed over Johnson’s head. That put runners on second and third, but Greene redeemed himself by striking out Geovanny Soto.

An error cost the Yankees a run in the third, but this one was by Brian Roberts. With runners on first and third with one out, the second baseman dropped shortstop Derek Jeter’s throw that might have started a double play but instead allowed the runner from third to score. Again, Greene got a strikeout to minimize the damage and end the inning.

With two out in the fourth, Greene was at it again throwing to first base as if 6-foot-8 Dellin Betances was the fielder there. Greene fielded a dribbler by Soto and threw another sailer well out of Johnson’s reach. When Rougned Odor hit a tapper to the mound, the crowd roared its approval when Greene ran toward first base and made an accurate toss to Johnson for the final out.

It took five innings for the Yankees’ hits to catch up with their errors. Jacoby Ellsbury’s eighth home run of the season, a solo shot leading off the fourth against Texas starter Miles Mikolas, was only the Yankees’ second hit. They got to four to match their errors with singles by Francisco Cervelli and Zelous Wheeler. A walk to Brett Gardner loaded the bases, but Jeter grounded into a double play.

If many of those Rangers names seem strange, well, that is because so many of their regulars are injured. Texas has already had 51 different players, including 30 pitchers, on its roster this year. Both figures are records for prior to the All-Star break. The Rangers have sunk to the bottom of the American League West by losing 24 of their previous 28 games.

Sometimes it’s easy being Greene

The Yankees’ rotation has had an overhaul this season with four-fifths of the Opening Day starting unit gone to the disabled list. The situation has afforded opportunities to some pitchers. Shane Greene is one who has given the Yankees reason to believe they just might get through this crisis.

The Floridian righthander earned his first major-league victory earlier in the week at Cleveland and followed it up Saturday with an even more impressive performance at Baltimore. Greene’s 7 2/3 innings of shutout ball in the Yankees’ 3-0 victory was quite a showing in the hitting paradise that is Camden Yards.

Just as he did last Monday night against the Indians, Greene had his sinker working as few balls hit by the Orioles made their way to the outfield. Other than their four hits, all singles, only two other batted balls by the Birds were outfield flies. Green got 10 outs on infield grounders and another on an infield popup. Oh, yeah, he also totaled nine strikeouts. Nelson Cruz, who entered the game tied for the major league lead in home runs (28) and RBI (74), went down on strikes three times.

This was an outing similar to what we have seen this year from another rookie righthander, Masahiro Tanaka. There will be no suggestion here that Greene is the equivalent of the Japanese phenom, but the Triple A Scranton call-up has proved a worthy substitute trying to work his way into the Yankees’ plans.

Greene did not allow a hit until two outs in the fifth inning. Manny Machado broke up the no-hit bid with a single to left, and Ryan Flaherty followed with a single to center that sent Machado to third base.

The score was 1-0 at that point, so it was a juncture when Greene might have wavered. Instead, he kept the Orioles off the board with a strikeout of Nick Hundley, the same guy whose 10th-inning single Friday night did in the Yankees.

The Orioles threatened again in the sixth when Nick Markakis and Steve Pearce began the inning with well-struck singles. If Greene ever needed a ground ball, this was the time. He got it, too, in the direction of Brian Roberts, who gloved it near second base, got to the bag for the force and made an off-balanced throw to first base for a rally-injuring double play. Greene supplied the killing blow by striking out Cruz.

The Yankees then supported their young pitcher in a way they have not been doing in recent games in which they have often taken early leads but have not tacked on runs later on. Orioles starter Chris Tillman kept pace with Greene for six innings. The Yankees scored a run in the third on a double by Mark Teixeira but lost another run when Derek Jeter was thrown out at the plate.

In the seventh, a pair of two-out hits, a single by Jeter off Tillman and a double by Jacoby Ellsbury off reliever T.J. McFarland, gave the Yanks two key insurance run. Brian McCann’s third hit of the game almost got another run in, but a strong throw to the plate by center fielder Adam Jones nailed Ellsbury.

It was encouraging to see the Yankees put together a sustained attack in the late innings, but as it turned out one run was all Greene needed. After he got the first out of the eighth, Greene was removed for lefthander David Huff, who gave up a single to Nick Markakis. Shawn Kelley got the final two outs of the inning before David Robertson finished it off with a perfect ninth for his 23rd save.

So after two brilliant starts, Greene is 2-0 with a 1.32 ERA and has given the Yankees hope that there may be more good stuff to come.

“He’s stepping up; that’s for sure,” Girardi told reporters. “He’s earning starts is what he’s doing.”