Results tagged ‘ Vidal Nuno ’

Yanks beat Twins, drop Soriano, deal Nuno

Sunday was a busy day for the Yankees. They designated Alfonso Soriano for assignment, traded Vidal Nuno to the Diamondbacks for another starting pitcher, Brandon McCarthy, and built a 9-0 lead over the Twins by the fourth inning and hung on to win, 9-7.

The game was the best part of the day as the Yankees took three of four games from Minnesota. Derek Jeter had three hits to raise his career total to 3,400. He received a standing ovation from the crowd at Target Field during his ninth-inning at-bat, which the fans figured was his last in their ballpark. Well, he will back be there again next week when the All-Star Game is played. Jeter was chosen by the fans to start at shortstop for the American League.

Also with a three-hit game was Ichiro Suzuki, who has become the Yanks’ regular right fielder now that Soriano is gone. They were in a platoon until Sunday, a platoon that was not working for Soriano.

What a difference a year makes. Last July 26, Soriano returned to the Yankees in a trade from the Cubs for minor league pitcher Corey Black and gave the team a jump-start in the second half. He hit .256 with 17 home runs and 50 RBI in 58 games and 219 at-bats.

Yet in essentially the same amount of time this year (67 games and 226 at-bats) Soriano hit .221 with six home runs and 23 RBI. He was batting only .204 against right-handed pitching and was facing most lefthanders in a platoon but was hitting only .247 against them. He had not hit a home run in 73 at-bats since May 17. Soriano had a miserable game Saturday as he went 0-for-4 and made two fielding blunders in left field although he was not charged with any errors.

With Carlos Beltran limited to designated hitter duty because of an ailing right elbow, right field now belongs to Suzuki, who began the season on the bench but has become the Yankees’ leading hitter with a .294 average.

Brian McCann returned to the lineup and caught after missing two games because of a sore left foot. He drove in one of the Yanks’ two first-inning runs with a double. They pounded Twins starter Ricky Nolasco for four more runs in the third, three coming on Jacoby Ellsbury’s fifth home run of the season.

By the fourth inning, the Yankees were up, 9-0, but Hiroki Kuroda could hardly coast. He was cuffed for four runs, seven hits and two walks and committed an error in 5 2/3 innings. Adam Warren, Jim Miller and David Robertson allowed one run apiece as the Twins got within two runs before D-Rob notched his 21st save. Robertson is averaging 16.43 strikeouts per nine innings, the best mark in the majors among pitchers with at least 25 innings. Eight of his past nine outs have been by strikeout.

Robertson was passed over for the All-Star Game, however, as two other Yankees pitchers were named to the AL staff, Masahiro Tanaka and Dellin Betances. The latter is a rarity considering that most pitchers chosen for All-Star staffs are starters or closers. Robertson himself was one of those exceptions when he was selected for the game at Phoenix in 2011 when he was still a setup reliever.

Nuno, 26, pitched in 17 games for the Yankees this season and was 2-5 with a 5.42 ERA in 78 innings while posting a .282 opponents average with 26 walks and 60 strikeouts. In his 14 starts, he was 2-5 with a 4.89 ERA in 73 2/3 innings.

The 5-foot-11, 195-pounder is only the 12th pitcher since 1900 to pitch at least five innings while allowing two runs or less and five hits or less in each of his first four major league starts, according to Elias Sports Bureau. He made his big-league debut last year and in five games, including three starts, was 1-2 with a 2.25 ERA in 20 innings. In his three starts, Nuno was 1-1 with a 2.12 ERA in17 innings.

In 22 career games (17 starts) for the Yankees, he was 3-7 with a 4.78 ERA, a .268 opponents average, 32 walks and 69 strikeouts in 98 innings. Nuno, who will turn 27 on July 26, signed with the Yankees as a minor-league free agent June 18, 2011. He was originally selected by the Indians in the 48th round of the 2009 First-Year Player Draft out of Baker University in Baldwin City, Kan. He was born in San Diego and resides in National City, Calif.

McCarthy, who turns 31 Monday, has a 3-10 record with a 5.01 ERA, a .298 opponents average, 20 walks and 93 strikeouts in 18 starts and 109 2/3 innings this season. He started 40 games over parts of two seasons with Arizona and went 8-21 with a 4.75 ERA, a .297 opponents average, 41 walks and 169 strikeouts in 244 2/3 innings. McCarthy has a career mark of 45-60 with a 4.21 ERA in 193 games (139 starts) over nine major league seasons with the White Sox (2005-06), Rangers (2007-09), Athletics (2011-12) and D-backs (2013-14).

The 6-foot-7 righthander is expected to make his first start for the Yankees Wednesday night at Cleveland. The Yankees plan to call up righthander Shane Greene from Triple A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to start Monday night against the Indians.

Girardi awarded for sticking with Nuno

It would not have surprised anyone if Yankees manager Joe Girardi used Thursday’s open date to skip over Vidal Nuno in the rotation. The lefthander has struggled over the past six weeks as an emergency starter in the Yankees’ injury-riddled rotation. With Thursday’s open date, the Yanks’ first off day in 24 days, Girardi could have sat down Nuno and kept the rest of the rotation on schedule.

Fans of Masahiro Tanaka would not have minded that, either, because by starting Friday night the Japanese righthander would have put himself in position to pitch in the All-Star Game. As it is now, while he may be named to the American League squad Tanaka is doubtful to be able to pitch in the July 15 All-Star Game at Minneapolis’ Target Field because barring rainouts his final start before the break would be Sunday, July 13, at Baltimore.

Despite fielding many questions about Nuno’s place in the starting unit, Girardi reiterated that his rotation will have no change, at least not for now. So Nuno took the mound Friday night against the Red Sox in the opener of a three-game series in front of a full-house crowd of 48,522 at Yankee Stadium and came up with his best start of the season.

Nuno pitched 5 2/3 scoreless innings and allowed two hits and two walks with five strikeouts to earn his first winning decision in nine starts since May 7 and end a personal four-game losing streak. As recently as two starts ago at Oakland, Nuno was pounded for eight earned runs in three innings as his ERA skied to 5.90. He dropped it to 5.42 Friday night with all the zeroes he put up on the scoreboard.

There is still much room for improvement for Nuno, but this was a positive start toward that end. He limited the defending World Series champions to a single by Jonny Gomes in the second and a double by Brock Holt in the third. When he walked David Ortiz with two out in the sixth, Nuno was replaced by Dellin Betances, who along with Adam Warren and Matt Thornton preserved the shutout.

Mark Teixeira gave Nuno a 1-0 lead in the first inning against righthander Brandon Workman on a sacrifice fly. The Yankees broke open the game in fourth with a pair of home runs, a two-run blast by Kelly Johnson and a solo shot by Brett Gardner back-to-back. They pushed the score to 6-0 with another homer in the eighth, a two-run bomb into the second deck in right field by Brian McCann off lefthander Craig Breslow.

It was a great way to start the weekend. And by not toying with the rotation, Girardi created a dream matchup Saturday night at the Stadium with Tanaka opposing Jon Lester.

Long ball haunts Nuno at Stadium

Probably a lot that could be written about Vidal Nuno this year would be similar to what pertained to Phil Hughes last year. He may not be suited for Yankee Stadium. There is a big difference, however, and it is not favorable for Nuno. He is left-handed.

Traditionally, the Stadium has favored lefthanders, much more so many years ago when the left-center field fence at the original yard was 467 feet from the plate, much deeper than the 399-foot power alley at the current Stadium.

The Orioles smacked four home runs Saturday in a 6-1 victory over the Yankees with only one of the drives, an opposite-field job by Nelson Cruz, dipping into the right-field porch. The home runs off Nuno by Adam Jones in the first inning and Steve Pearce in the fifth both landed in the left field seats as did J.J. Hardy’s first homer of the year, in the eighth off Jose Ramirez.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi acknowledged that Nuno is “a bit of a fly-ball pitcher,” the same handle once attached to Hughes, who was often victimized by the long ball at the Stadium. Nuno is now filling that role. He has allowed 13 home runs in 39 1/3 innings at the Stadium this year compared to two in 28 innings on the road.

“He made some mistakes,” Girardi said. “Unfortunately, when he is making mistakes, they are hitting them out of the park.”

“I left fastballs up that were supposed to sink,” Nuno said. “I have no regrets about my approach, but they got to my fastball.”

Did the Orioles ever. Baltimore’s home run derby made it another dark day for Nuno, who remained winless in eight starts since May 7 at Anaheim when he earned his only victory of the season. Nuno is 0-4 with a 4.37 ERA since his last victory. His record at the Stadium this year fell to 0-3 with a 7.09 ERA.

Naturally, Girardi had to field questions about Nuno’s place in the rotation. The skipper has not changed his view. Michael Pineda’s snail-paced return from shoulder soreness creates the need for Nuno in the rotation. Pineda still has inflammation in the area and does not appear to be close to returning.

Adam Warren remains an option, but Girardi is comfortable with the righthander in the bullpen. I don’t blame him. If Warren goes into the rotation, who would do what he does in the pen? Nuno? I don’t think so.

The debate is a waste of time because Girardi is not about to make a change.

“It’s not like there are starting pitchers lying around out there,” he said. “This is our rotation and what it will be.”

A home run also accounted for the Yankees’ only scoring. Mark Teixeira clouted his 12th of the season in the fourth inning off eventual winning pitcher Bud Norris. That the Yankees could do no more damage and that Nuno could not keep the ball in the yard put an end to their four-game winning streak.

HOPE Week: Musicians on Call

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Bernie Williams [C with guitar] is joined by Musicians on Call volunteer Jeremy Bar-Illan [far L with guitar] and Yankees Chase Whitley [obscured by Bar-Illan], Vidal Nuno [behind Williams], Carlos Beltran [red pants] and Adam Warren [far R] in performing at the bedside of hospital patient Jasmine Delmonte.

Outfielders Carlos Beltran and Brett Gardner; pitchers Vidal Nuno, Adam Warren and Chase Whitley and former Yankees center fielder Bernie Williams went to the Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital at NewYork-Presbyterian, where they performed in a concert Thursday with Musicians on Call in the hospital’s “Wintergarden.”

The Yankees’ group as part of HOPE Week (Helping Others Persevere and Excel) then visited patients who were confined to their rooms and unable to attend the concert. In the evening, volunteer musicians, guides and Musicians on Call representatives were guests of the Yankees for their game against the Blue Jays.

In 1999, Michael Solomon and Vivek Tiwary sponsored a concert for patients at a Manhattan hospital. Upon witnessing the joy that the event brought patients, Musicians on Call was born. Since its inception 15 years ago, the organization has seen hundreds of volunteer musicians perform for more than 400,000 individuals with a focus on reaching patients confined to their rooms and afforded very little interaction with others due to their illnesses. Based in New York City, the organization has grown greatly over the last 15 years, expanding to include locations in Philadelphia, Nashville, Miami, Los Angeles, Baltimore and Washington, D.C.

One of Musicians on Call’s volunteers is Jeremy Bar-Illan, who joined the organization in January 2011, and has since volunteered on a weekly basis.

“Music is the bridge to a moment of tranquility for patients and their families,” Bar-Illan said. “There is very little in a hospital that brings peace and comfort to patients. Most of the time it comes in the form of pharmaceutical painkillers. Music creates a moment for everyone to step out of the reality of illness. After I complete a hospital program, or support a non-profit, I feel like the richest man in the world on so many levels. To me, my experience with music as a bridge — a source of healing — is priceless.”

Pete Griffin, President of Musicians on Call, echoes Bar-Illan’s sentiment. “Whether it’s to reduce anxiety or stress before a big game, or to elevate our moods and ease recovery while in a hospital, music is the universal language of healing,” Griffin said. “It’s an honor to work with the wonderful caregivers at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital at NewYork-Presbyterian, the New York Yankees and our amazing volunteers to deliver the healing power of music to the bedsides of patients.”

Yankees glad to get back home

The Yankees’ West Coast swing that looked so promising there for a while ended with a thud. After an uplifting, 7-0 victory in Oakland Friday night that followed their three-sweep of the Mariners in Seattle, the Yankees dropped the last two games to the Athletics, who’s best record in the American League is clearly no fluke.

The Yanks managed only three hits off Scott Kazmir through six innings and two relievers retired them in order over the final three innings in a 5-1 setback Saturday. Vidal Nuno was stung for a pair of three-run homers by Derek Norris and Coco Crisp in the first two innings Sunday as Oakland went on to build a 10-0 lead and coast to a 10-5 victory.

Nuno, who was charged with eight earned runs in three-plus innings, has a bloated 5.90 ERA to go with a 1-3 record, but manager Joe Girardi gave no indication of any change in the rotation upcoming. The skipper has stated he plans to go with the current five starters – three of whom are rookies – until the All-Star break, which is still a month away.

There was some sloppiness involved in the two losses at Oakland. Backup catcher John Ryan Murphy was guilty of three passed balls in two games. Brendan Ryan, inserted in Sunday’s game for defense, made an error. Carlos Beltran forgot the number of outs in the eighth inning while on the bases and wandered himself into a double play. Beltran did hit a home run, which was a sign that he may be ready to break out offensively after his disabled list stint when he received a cortisone shot in his elbow. On the plus side, Derek Jeter batted .435 on the West Coast portion of the recently-completed trip.

The Yankees will stay in their own division for a while, beginning with a three-game series against the AL East-leading Blue Jays that opens the homestand starting Tuesday night. The Orioles come to Yankee Stadium for a three-game set beginning Friday night. The Yankees will then travel to Toronto for a three-game series next week and come home to play three games each against the Red Sox and the Rays before embarking on their final trip leading into the All-Star break.

Yanks’ dominance of the Twins fading?

The streak of games in which Yankees starting pitchers allowed three runs or fewer ended at 14 Friday night as Vidal Nuno gave up four runs, all on home runs, by the fourth inning against the Twins in an eventual 6-1 loss.

Vidal gave up a solo home run to Oswaldo Arcia in the second inning. Two innings later, Minnesota went deep twice more on a leadoff blow by Josh Willingham and a two-run shot by Trevor Plouffe that landed in the netting atop Monument Park.

Prior to that, Yankees starters had not allowed more than three runs in a game since May 14, a period covering 83 innings in which they had a combined ERA of 2.82. It was the longest such streak by a Yankees rotation since a 15-gamer in 2009 from June 14 to July 1.

The Yankees at least got some length from Nuno, who lasted two batters into the seventh inning. The long ball has been an issue for the lefthander this year. He has given up nine home runs in 47 2/3 innings.

Curiously, Yankee Stadium has not been kind to Nuno. He is 0-3 with a 5.86 ERA in six career games covering 30 2/3 innings at the Stadium. In five career road starts, Nuno has a 2-0 record with a 1.84 ERA in 29 1/3 innings.

The Yankees failed to generate much of an offense against Twins starter Ricky Nolasco, who entered the game with a 6.12 ERA and winless in five starts since April 24. They scored one run in the third inning on a two-out, RBI double by Jacoby Ellsbury but spent much of the game running themselves out of rallies.

Brian Roberts led off the second inning with a single but was picked off first base and thrown out at second. Brett Gardner, running from second base on a single to right by Derek Jeter in the third, was caught in a rundown between third and the plate and tagged out. In the sixth, Roberts was gunned down again, this time at home trying to score from second base on a two-out single to right by Yangervis Solarte.

The Minnesota lineup included former Yankees infielder Eduardo Nunez as the designated hitter. He had an RBI single off Preston Claiborne in the Twins’ two-run eighth inning. Another former Yankee, pitcher Phil Hughes, will start for the Twins Sunday.

Mark Teixeira returned to the Yankees’ lineup after missing three games because of inflammation in his surgical right wrist and reached base three times on walks but did not advance beyond first base on a quiet night for the Yanks’ offense.

The Yankees’ mastery of the Twins, especially at the Stadium, during this century has faded somewhat. The Yankees have a 31-10 record at the Stadium against Minnesota but are under .500 (6-7) since May 16, 2010. The Yankees won 10 straight home series against the Twins from 2002 through 2011 but lost one series and split the other over the past two seasons. Overall, the Yankee are 26-10 against the Twins since the start of the 2009 season.

D-Rob & Yanks come off the deck

If there is one thing David Robertson learned from Mariano Rivera about the closer’s role it is that you cannot dwell on blown saves. They are a hazard of the profession and while fans will agonize over squandered saves the closer cannot. It is a job like housekeeping in that people do not notice it as much unless you do not do it.

The daily grind of the baseball schedule demands that players turn the page, particularly closers. Like his predecessor, Robertson wanted another save opportunity the very next day after he gave up a game-winning, two-run home run to White Sox first baseman Adam Dunn in the bottom of the ninth inning Friday night. D-Rob got that chance Saturday after the Yankees came off the deck and scored three runs in the ninth inning against Chicago to tie the score and went ahead in the 10th on a home run by Jacoby Ellsbury with two out.

Robertson preserved the Yankees’ lead this time as he has done now in 10 of 11 save chances. He struck out the side. The third strikeout came after pesky Adam Eaton (8-for-14 in the series) singled with two out and stole second. So getting Gordon Beckham looking to end the game was a pressurized situation for Robertson.

This was a game the Yankees needed desperately. For the second straight day, the club that took a 3-0 lead in the first inning did not go on to win. The Yankees had the first-inning lead Friday night on Brian McCann’s three-run homer, but Hiroki Kuroda couldn’t hold it. The Yanks went in front again by a run with two runs in the seventh, but Robertson’s blown save cost them.

Saturday, the White Sox scored three runs in the first off Vidal Nuno, who tightened after that and pitched into the eighth without allowing another run. Yankees bats remained cold, however, as they had only one hit through seven innings and three through eight against lefthander John Danks. Now it would be the White Sox closer who would blow the save.

With two out and a runner on first base, the Yanks erupted for three runs off righthander Ronald Belisario, who nearly blew a save to them two nights ago when he gave up two runs in the ninth but held on to nail down a 3-2 White Sox victory. A double by Alfonso Soriano got one run in, and singles by Yangervis Solarte and McCann as a pinch hitter delivered two more. It marked the second time on the Chicago trip that the Yankees tied the score in the ninth after being shut out for eight innings and went on to win in extras. They came from behind to beat the Cubs, 4-2, in 13 innings Wednesday at Wrigley Field.

Ellsbury, who had started the ninth-inning rally with a single, came through with the 10th-inning homer off righthander Zach Putnam. Ellsbury looked as if he might be coming out of a prolonged slump with a couple of extra-inning hits at Wrigley, but he then went 0-for-11 at U.S. Cellular Field before his ninth-inning single. The center fielder was batting .348 as late as May 3 but is now down to .263. Maybe the game-winning homer is just what he needs to get hot again.

It certainly was what the Yankees needed on what was turning into a brutal trip. Now they have a shot at squaring the season Sunday behind Masahiro Tanaka and take some momentum into St. Louis Monday for the start of what will be their last inter-league series of the regular season.

Sunday in New York: A disappointing split

The first Sunday doubleheader at Yankee Stadium in 17 years brought back some nostalgic thoughts, among them that this was awful lot of baseball in one day. For the diehard fans, that was fine. Consider me among those who do not mind two games back-to-back on the same day, provided as it used to be and was again this time that the next day is an open date.

That was the case years ago when clubs had 16 to 18 doubleheaders on their schedule. The economics of the game changed all that. There is no way in this day and age that clubs would concede that many dates. Truth be told, a separate-admission doubleheader may have been scheduled to make up for Friday night’s rainout but conflicts with national television networks FoxSports Saturday and ESPN Sunday forced the Yankees and the Pirates to play a single-admission twin bill Sunday.

Another issue with any doubleheader is fatigue. The Pirates on the last leg of a six-game trip through Milwaukee and New York looked like a tired team. They made two errors that resulted in two runs for the Yanks in the second inning and ran themselves out of two rallies with a couple of blunders on the bases. The Pirates were able to overcome those early lapses to salvage a split of the doubleheader with a 5-3 victory after the Yankees had won the first game, 4-3.

The Yankees did not play all that soundly in the second game, either. They, too, had a pair of errors in the top of the second that gave the Pirates a freebie run. In the first inning, Brett Gardner, who led off with a triple, got picked off third base by a former teammate, catcher Chris Stewart, who hurt the Yankees again the next inning with an RBI single. Stew got a second RBI in the ninth with a sacrifice fly for an insurance run.

“There were a lot of weird things that happened in the first two innings,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “Then it became a baseball game.”

Vidal Nuno was following in the string of solid starts this turn in the rotation with no earned runs over the first five innings. The lefthander was stung by a two-run home run by Starling Marte in the sixth that put the Bucs ahead, 3-2, but the Yankees quickly tied it on a homer by Yangervis Solarte in the bottom of that inning.

Josh Harrison’s solo home run off Alfredo Aceves (0-2) with two out in the seventh regained the lead for Pittsburgh. Harrison also made the defensive play of the game one inning later. After Derek Jeter singled as a pinch hitter leading off the eighth, Harrison, who had moved to left field from third base the previous inning when Marte came out of the game with a hamstring injury, made a diving catch on the warning track to rob Solarte of a potential extra-base hit that likely would have scored Jeter with the tying run.

Jeter stayed in the game at shortstop the next inning, which led to an unusual alignment as Ryan moved over to first base. Kelly Johnson started there but was lifted for Jeter. It was the first time in his major-league career that Ryan played the position. He handled one chance without incident.

Mark Teixeira was already in the game as the designated hitter, so moving him would have put the pitcher in the batting order. Ryan had to stay in the game because there were no other infielders available if God forbid one of them got hurt.

The second game was definitely a downer against a team that seemed to be handing them the game at the beginning. Nevertheless, the Yankees ended the day in first place in the American League East and a pitching staff that is making do despite losing three-fifths of its Opening Day rotation to injury. The starters were 3-0 with a 1.47 ERA in 30 2/3 innings over this turn in the rotation. It starts all over again Tuesday night at Wrigley Field in Chicago with Masahiro Tanaka taking the mound.

One other piece of nostalgia: This was the Pirates’ first victory at the Stadium since Game 5 of the 1960 World Series and in nine regular-season games during inter-league play.

Stadium way too friendly to Mets

The Mets may not want to go back to Citi Field for the final two games of the Subway Series. They were very comfortable at Yankee Stadium the past two nights and made the Yankees awfully uncomfortable at the same time.

The Mets entered the series with one of the poorest offensive records in the major leagues and averaging only 3.9 runs per game. They blistered Yankees pitching for 21 runs and 24 hits, including six home runs, in the two games combined at the Stadium.

As New York Daily News sports columnist Mike Lupica quipped to me Tuesday night in the press box, “What kind of rivalry is it if one team wins all the games?”

It has not been much of a rivalry recently. The Mets won all four games last year and have taken the first two this year. The Yankees will rely on Masahiro Tanaka to turn the tide Wednesday night. The Mets will counter by starting one of their top pitching prospects, Rafael Montero, a righthander who will make his major-league debut.

Pitching has not been pretty in the series thus far. Neither starter Tuesday night lasted long enough to qualify for a victory. Yankees lefthander Vidal Nuno gave up seven runs (five earned) on only four hits but also four walks and a hit batter in 3 1/3 innings. Mets righthander Zack Wheeler was given leads of 4-0 and 7-3 but could not keep the Yankees at bay and was gone after 4 1/3 innings in which he allowed five runs, seven hits and six walks.

Matt Daley, a Triple A Scranton callup, was the Yankees’ most effective pitcher with three shutout innings of one-hit, one-walk, three-strikeout relief, but it was largely in a mop-up capacity. The righthander lowered his ERA from 27.00 to 8.31. Considering the state of the pitching staff, Daley’s work was well appreciated by manager Joe Girardi.

The skipper was confused as to why he was ejected from the game by plate umpire Jerry Layne. “I got thrown out and still don’t know why,” Girardi said. “There have been plenty of times I have been thrown out of games when I certainly deserved it, but I didn’t say anything this time.”

The game lingered for 3 hours, 58 minutes, and not much of it was pretty for the Yankees except for the home runs by Brian McCann, who had three hits and three RBI, and Yangervis Solarte, so maybe Girardi ended up with the best seat in the house.

Granderson hurts Yankees again

The Mets picked up from where they left off the previous game and put some more hurt on the battered Yankees in the first inning Tuesday night in Round 2 of the Subway Series.

Mark Teixeira, who is dealing with a tender groin, was back in the lineup as the designated hitter, but Ichiro Suzuki was still unable to take batting practice because of knee and back issues. Needing help in the outfield, the Yankees recalled Zoilo Almonte from Triple A Scranton and placed relief pitcher Shawn Kelley (back stiffness) on the 15-day disabled list. The Yankees are expected to bring up another pitcher to start Thursday night’s game at Citi Field.

Tuesday night’s starter, Vidal Nuno, had a rough time of it as he was touched for four runs in the first inning. The lefthander was wild from the start with a hit batter and walk preceding a single by David Wright for his 900th career run batted in.

Old friend Curtis Granderson wasn’t the least bit friendly to his former teammates as he drove a 1-1 pitch to right field for his fifth home run, a three-run shot, and second in two nights at Yankee Stadium. Man, he must really miss this place.

The Yankees did bounce back in the bottom of the first to put up three runs off Mets starter Zack Wheeler, who also began shakily by allowing a single to Brett Gardner and walking Derek Jeter. The rally seemed over when Jacoby Ellsbury grounded into a double play, but Teixeira singled to right for one run and Brian McCann homered off a 3-2 pitch for two more.

Nuno could not make it through the fourth inning. Wright, who had a big night and extending his hitting streak to 11 games, doubled in the third and scored on a sacrifice fly by Juan Lagares. A throwing error by third baseman Yangervis Solarte on a potential double-play pivot opened the gate for another Mets run in the fourth on a sac fly by Daniel Murphy.

Murphy was even more damaging against righthander Alfredo Aceves an inning later when he smashed a towering three-run home run off the right field foul pole and not far from the top of it. If not obstructed, the ball would have landed in the upper deck, a place where precious few home runs have landed in the six-year-old structure. Who says Daniel Murphy has no power?